Mar 27, 2019

 

Book Review - Kill Code: A Dystopian Science Fiction Novel (by Clive Fleury)

Title: Kill Code: A Dystopian Science Fiction Novel
Series: -
Author: Clive Fleury
Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopia
Publisher: TCK Publishing
Release Date: December 3rd, 2018
Format: Paperback
Pages: 148



"WHEN THE OCEANS RISE...THE TRUTH DROWNS

It's the year 2031. Our future. Their present. A world decimated by climate catastrophe, where the sun's heat is deadly and the ocean rises higher every day. A world ruled by the rich, powerful, and corrupt. A world where a good man can't survive for long.

Hogan Duran was a good man once. He was a cop, forced to resign in disgrace when he couldn't save his partner from a bullet. Now Hogan lives on the fraying edges of society, serving cruel masters and scavenging trash dumps just to survive.

But after four years of living in poverty, Hogan finally gets a chance to get back on his feet. He's invited to join the National Security Council, the powerful paramilitary organization responsible for protecting the rich and powerful from the more unsavory elements of society. All he needs to do is pass their deadly entrance exam, and he'll be rewarded with wealth and opportunity beyond his wildest dreams.

But this ex-cop's path to redemption won't be easy. The NSC are hiding something, and as Hogan descends deeper and deeper into their world, he starts to uncover the terrible truth of how the powerful in this new world maintain their power...and just how far they will go to protect their secrets.

In a world gone wrong, can one man actually make a difference, or will he die trying?"

(click to read an excerpt on Amazon)

- Review -
What Made Me Read It
I was sent a copy of the novel in exchange for an honest review. I'm not usually drawn to military genres but the blurb and some of the reviews I read hinted at interesting character conflicts so I decided to give it a try.

The Plot
In the near future, climate change has caused irreversible damage to the planet with rising sea levels submerging entire cities, high temperatures destroying agriculture and increased pollution making it hard to breathe. The world economy has collapsed and only 1/5 of the population can maintain a regular job, while the elite live in wealthy enclaves protected by high walls and security forces.

Hogan Duran used to be a cop, until the day he failed to prevent his partner from getting shot. Five years later, Hogan struggles to survive and provide for his disabled friend. During the day he works as a newspaper delivery man for the Los Angeles Free Times; at night he's a Picker, scavenging the trash dumps of "The Hills" for discarded food and other necessary goods. His only hope of a better life lies in joining the National Security Council ranks.

But the NSC is an elite security force and being selected as an officer is a tough challenge; the competition is fierce, the training brutal, and at 33 years of age Hogan is getting too old to successfully pass the tests and prove his worth. When NSC Base Camp 17 is raided by the Krail, a gang of outlaws who live in the wastelands beyond the cities, Hogan begins to question his decision to join the elite group. For the leader of the Krail hands him a warning: the NSC isn't the beneficial force it claims to be and the price of admittance may be too high to pay.

The Good
"Kill Code" is the first book in a series of dystopian novels set in the near future. Told in the first person through the eyes of the main character Hogan Duran, a 33 years old ex-cop who struggles to survive in a decaying Los Angeles, ruined by extreme climate change and a collapsed economy and society. After quitting the police force over the guilt of his partner's injury, Hogan's last hope to escape the poverty he lives in is to apply for a position inside the National Security Council, an elite security force that provides protection to the powerful and wealthy. But the selection process is brutal, the competition fierce and his own values a handicap.

The story is fast-paced with plenty of action sequences as the main character tries to pass the punishing physical, mental and emotional tests on NSC Base Camp 17 and fend off an attack from the Krails, a band of outlaws who roam the wastelands and frequently raid the metropolis.

This first volume is short in length and a quick read, with just enough world building to get a general idea of the background setting for the main plot. The author paints a grim future where extreme climate change has led to famine, economic collapse and social inequality; a sort of cautionary tale based on today's reality: political administrations denying the existence of climate change, rising xenophobia and racism prompting repressive border control, police brutality and power abuse, media misinformation practices. But being set in the future, there's also a few interesting sci-fi gadgets: glider steel balls used for communication, cerebral scanners that probe for psychological defects, robotic hand-to-hand combat simulation units and virtual reality rooms.

The main character is 3-dimentional and complex, we follow his personal journey through all his mental and emotional states: from his guilt over his partner's injury to his determination to escape a life of poverty, his weaknesses and strengths during the selection process, his doubts when he realizes the NSC isn't what it's supposed to be and indecision between a life of privilege over his core values. The secondary characters (the NSC senior officers General Stoker and Commander Beecham, the candidates Jake Teerman and Ruby Mason, and the Krail leader Hunter) are mostly stereotypical but they fulfill their roles well as allies and antagonists.

It took me too long to warm up to the plot. A big portion of the novel focus on the merciless selection process to join the ranks of the NSC and I just couldn't connect with the theme. I don't particularly enjoy the military genre and even though the main character was interesting and well developed the book failed to catch my interest. But that's just a personal distaste, for those readers who do enjoy the genre the book delivers on its promise. The plot twist about 3/4 of the way though was brilliant and completely unexpected, it was a work of art that earned the novel an extra book/star in the final rating.

Final Rating
"Kill Code" is a fast-paced and action packed dystopian novel set in the near future. Recommended for those who enjoy military genre and survival stories with a focus on climate change and economic and social collapse.



• • • •


- About the Author -
Website: clivefleurywriter.com
Twitter: @clivefleury
Genre: Science Fiction, Young Adult, Horror

Hi, I’m Clive and when I was young, a man behind a big desk who called himself a ‘Career Specialist’ fell about laughing when I told him I wanted to tell stories. He had other plans for me. “You should be an engineer, that’s what you should be,” he said.

Luckily I ignored his advice, because if I hadn’t I wouldn’t have embarked upon a life that is all about telling stories, either through writing, as an author and screenplay scribe, or in pictures, through television and movies – as a director and producer.

I hope you enjoy reading my latest venture, which was written in Miami where I live with my wife, teenage daughter, and cat Louis. It definitely and absolutely has nothing to do with engineering.


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Mar 24, 2019

 

Book Review - The Coordinate (by Marc Jacobs)

 
Title: The Coordinate
Series: -
Author: Marc Jacobs
Genre: Young Adult, Mystery & Thriller, Science Fiction
Release Date: Summer 2019
Format: Ebook (ARC)
Pages: 377
 



"Logan West and Emma James grew up together but are now high school seniors going in totally opposite directions after graduation. When they are assigned to work together on one last history project, they hardly expect the monotony of high school life to change. Instead, as they decode a series of unexplained clues hidden within their history project itself, Logan and Emma manage to unfold an ancient mystery that has baffled scientists and archeologists, one that has powerful implications for the present day.
 

As they embrace the adventure they’ve stumbled upon, and a growing romantic attraction to each other, they are unexpectedly pursued by the world’s most rigorous intelligence agencies and ruthless criminals.

Logan and Emma find themselves caught up in a dangerous, high-stakes race across the globe to decipher mankind’s past in order to save humanity’s future, not to mention their very own lives, with a mystery that just might reach towards the stars…"

(click to contact the author Marc Jacobs if you
might be interested in reviewing a free ARC)

- Review -
What Made Me Read It
I was sent a copy of the novel in exchange for an honest review. The author described it as "Da Vinci Code for the high-school set, with archeological adventures and a sci-fi rather than religious mystery to uncover". As a fan of Dan Brown's Robert Langdon series, that caught my interest.
 

The Plot
17-year-old Logan West is starting his last year at Jersey North High School, with no future plans other than attend community college after graduation. When a school project pairs him with Emma James, Logan just sees an opportunity to reconnect with his childhood friend. The assignment: to write an essay on historical mysteries with oddities that have baffled historians and scientists alike; their subject - the Copán Temple.
 

Five years ago, Dr. Jones Arenot discovered a hidden crypt underneath the ruins of the Copán Temple in Western Honduras - the Secret Chamber of the White-Eyed Star God, a large spherical room with strange gravitational and temporal anomalies, and covered with thousands of seemingly random Mayan hieroglyphic numbers carved on the walls.
 

Logan and Emma begin their research only to find missing links, removed pictures and deleted websites related to the archeological discovery. Their only clue may lie in Christopher Columbus' personal journals of his 4th voyage to the New World, stored inside the Vatican Secret Archives. Determined to finish the increasingly puzzling project, Logan and Emma set out to Italy.
 

But what started out as an exciting weekend getaway rapidly turns into a dangerous race against time, as the CIA takes a sudden interest in their activities and international mercenaries try to kill them. Logan and Emma find themselves running for their lives, from the Archiginnasio in the University of Bologna, through the Norwegian fjords and into Britain's Stonehenge, while trying to decipher a message hundreds of years old connecting ancient landmarks to constellations in the night sky.
 

The Good
"The Coordinate" is a young adult adventure and mystery thriller, with both historical and science fiction elements, reminiscent of Dan Brown's Robert Langdon series and the National Treasure movies but without the religious theme and spanning several continents and historical landmarks. It follows the journey of two high school senior students working on a history project that draws unwanted attention from security agencies and mercenaries alike, while they try to unravel a mystery that connects ancient monuments to constellations in the night sky and a hidden message that could change the future of mankind.
 

The first half of the novel centers around the initial clues the two main characters, Logan and Emma, must decipher in order to complete the school project. The mystery is engaging and very intriguing; not only did the author do extensive research to include actual facts and real background information, but he brilliantly weaves it all with mythological legends, crackpot conspiracy theories and fictional elements from his own imagination into a whole that is not just credible but actually believable. The pace picks up in the 2nd half of the book, with chase and action sequences that are pure adrenaline rush, keeping us on the edge of our seats and with plot twists I did not see coming.
 

All the background information poured into the novel doesn't feel like an info dump and in no way slows down the pace or hinders the narrative, the author even includes a few maps and diagrams to help visualize the clues the main characters work through. Each piece of extra data is delivered in a natural way, from Google searches, to museum brochures and specific characters in specific situations where we expect them to possess that kind of knowledge. That isn't always easy to achieve but the author nails it throughout the novel.
 

The two main characters are 3-dimensional and believable, acting according to their age and personalities. Emma is the most daring of the pair, wanting one last adventure before following the path her attorney father set out for her. Logan isn't as brave but is willing to step out of his comfort zone and do anything to impress his childhood crush. The two teenagers complement each other, drawing on the other's strengths to solve the puzzles; their romance isn't the typical YA instalove kind but fits the characters, flows naturally and is not the center of the plot... which, for me, is a huge bonus since I tend to dislike any romantic element forced into the narrative.
 

Final Rating
"The Coordinate" is a fun, action-packed young adult novel, with an intriguing mystery and a thrilling engaging plot. Recommended for those who enjoy adventure stories with historical puzzles and sci-fi elements.


• • • •



- About the Author -
Website: marcjacobsauthor.com
Genre: Science Fiction, Young Adult, Mystery & Thrillers 
 

Author Marc Jacobs has always looked to the stars as a  reminder of humanity’s minuscule place in the universe. Marc finds inspiration in the science fiction genre because it feeds the imagination and keeps people believing in a greater world of possibilities. In THE COORDINATE, the first novel in Marc’s new science fiction series, he explores the question which has remained unanswered throughout the history of mankind, “Are we alone in the universe?”
 

When Marc is not writing, he lives in California with his wife, two daughters, two cats and an unapologetic English bulldog who runs the house, much to the chagrin of the cats.
 

Marc is also a cartoonist whose work has been published in magazines, journals, newsletters, and websites across the country and even internationally!
 



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Mar 18, 2019

 

Book Review - Star Wars: Queen's Shadow (by E.K. Johnston)

Title: Star Wars: Queen's Shadow
Series: Star Wars Disney Canon Novel
Author: E.K. Johnston
Genre: Science Fiction, Media Tie-In, Young Adult
Publisher: Disney Lucasfilm Press
Release Date: March 5th, 2019
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 352


"When Padmé Amidala steps down from her position as Queen of Naboo, she is ready to set aside her title and return to life outside of the spotlight. But to her surprise, the new queen asks Padmé to continue serving their people – this time in the Galactic Senate. Padmé is unsure about the new role but cannot turn down the request, especially since, thanks to her dearest friend – and decoy – Sabé, she can be in two places at once. So while Padmé plunges into politics, Sabé sets off on a mission dear to Padmé's heart.

On the glistening capital planet Coruscant, Padmé's new Senate colleagues regard her with curiosity – and with suspicion for her role in ousting the previous chancellor. Posing as a merchant on Tatooine, Sabé has fewer resources than she thought and fewer options than she needs.

Together with Padmé's loyal handmaidens, Padmé and Sabé must navigate treacherous politics, adapt to constantly changing landscapes, and forge a new identity beyond the queen's shadow."

(click to read an excerpt on Barnes&Noble)

- Review -
What Made Me Read It
As a long time fan of Star Wars it was a given. I really enjoyed E.K. Johnston's previous novel "Ahsoka" so I was looking forward to her portrayal of another Star Wars heroine, one that hasn't been explored much beyond the movies and animation shows.

The Plot
It's been four years since Padmé Amidala was elected Queen of Naboo; four years since liberating her planet from the clutches of the Trade Federation invasion army, forging a peace treaty with the Gungans and serving her people to the best of her abilities. Now it's time to step down and let someone else take on that responsibility, freeing Padmé and her loyal handmaidens to pursuit personal goals and dreams.

Naboo has been without a representative in the Galactic Senate since former Senator Palpatine was elected new Chancellor for the Republic and Padmé Amidala is the right person to take his place. So when newly-elected Queen Réillata asks her to continue serving as Senator for Naboo and the Chommel sector she cannot refuse.

But Coruscant and the Senate run by different rules and Padmé, with the help of her new handmaidens and security staff, must learn to navigate the politics and intrigues of Coruscant's high society while still upholding her home planet's traditions and values.

The Good
"Queen's Shadow" is a Star Wars novel for young adults, set between the events depicted in the movies Episode I: The Phantom Menace and Episode II: Attack of the Clones. The book follows Padmé Amidala and her handmaidens at the end of her term as Queen of Naboo and the start of her new position as Senator for Naboo in the Republic Senate.

It's a book that celebrates and explores women's empowerment, relationships and interdependency. After 4 years of successful reign, Padmé and the loyal handmaidens that served her through the invasion of Naboo by the droid armies of the Trade Federation go their separate ways. Sabé, Yané, Rabé, Saché and Eirtaé move on to start new lives as private citizens while Padmé is asked by the new Queen to continue serving the people of Naboo as Senator on Coruscant. But the political arena couldn't be more different from the traditions and values of her home planet and her skills as former queen aren't suited for the responsibilities and expectations of her new role. With the help of her old friend and decoy Sabé and the assistance of a new set of handmaidens (Dormé, Cordé and Versé) and security staff (Captain Mariek Panaka, Captain Tonra and Sergeant Typho), Padmé learns to adapt to the demands of her new life, making new allies, outwitting old enemies and proving her ability to serve the Republic as a whole beyond her loyalty to her home planet.

The book introduces new characters but also includes a series of familiar faces from the franchise: Senator Bail Organa and Queen Breha Organa of Alderaan, Senator Mon Mothma, Senator Rush Clovis, Senator Mina Bonteri and brief appearances from Chancellor Palpatine, R2-D2, Padmé's family and Master Jedi Depa Billaba, connecting the novel with the animated show The Clone Wars and novels from both the old Expanded Universe (now re-branded Legends) and the new canon ("Queen's Shadow" and "Leia: Princess of Alderaan" could easily be considered companion books). Still, the book reads as a standalone and you don't need prior knowledge from other media tie-ins to follow the plot.

The Not So Good
The author did a phenomenal job with her previous Star Wars novel "Ahsoka" but this book failed to catch my interest, I just couldn't connect with the characters and the story.

"Queen's Shadow" is not an action-packed novel, as opposed to most Star Wars books. Quite the opposite, there is no tension, not even a hint of a conflict; the pace is slow, which drags the plot considerably. Some reviewers label this novel as a political thriller but I can't agree with that assessment. The (old) Expanded Universe novels set during the Prequel Trilogy era explored the political conflict that led to the fall of the Republic and the rise of the Empire in a much better way. In particular, "The Cestus Deception" and "Labyrinth of Evil" were brilliant in illustrating the subtle and devious political maneuvering of Chancellor Palpatine in the destruction of the Republic, how each and every character was unknowingly and unwillingly manipulated into achieving his goals and objectives - Palpatine was one sneaky double-faced genius! But "Queen's Shadow" is just an ongoing narration of dull day-to-day duties and routines in the life of a common politician.

I usually enjoy a character driven plot but this novel failed to engage me even on that front, though to be fair through no direct fault of the author. Since the handmaidens are, by definition of their purpose and duties, meant to be easily dismissed and ignored to the point of invisibility so as to easily fulfill their role as the Queen's decoys, both sets of characters (the Queen's and the Senator's handmaidens) are one-dimensional and easily forgettable. They look the same, they act the same, even their names are almost identical, to the point where I couldn't distinguish one from the other (with the exception of Sabé but only because she had a slightly different subplot). The reader is told that each possesses a specific set of skills, her own personality, personal goals and dreams, but I couldn't see or feel those differences in the narrative.

As for Padmé Amidala herself, the character didn't act the way I expected her to. Even if the novel is meant to show her difficult transition from one reality to another, and the need to adapt and develop a new set of skills and mental agility to survive in Coruscant's political and social arena, this book's version of Padmé is, as one character puts it, incapable of lacing her own shoes without the assistance of her handmaidens. The Padmé from the movies and animated show is much more assertive and confident, even in moments of personal doubt and uncertainty... then again, she does literally die of a broken heart.

Overall, the novel was a personal disappointment - too much dull politics, nonexistent action and too much emphasis on the Queen's and Senator's wardrobe.

Final Rating
"Queen's Shadow" is a young adult political novel set in the Star Wars universe. Recommended for fans of Padmé Amidala and the Naboo handmaidens.


• • • •


- About the Author -
Website: www.ekjohnston.ca
Twitter: @ek_johnston
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

E.K. Johnston had several jobs and one vocation before she became a published writer. If she’s learned anything, it’s that things turn out weird sometimes, and there’s not a lot you can do about it. Well, that and how to muscle through awkward fanfic because it’s about a pairing she likes.

Her books range from contemporary fantasy (The Story of Owen, Prairie Fire), to fairy-tale reimaginings (A Thousand Nights, Spindle), and from small town Ontario (Exit, Pursued By A Bear), to a galaxy far, far away (Star Wars: Ahsoka). She has no plans to rein anything in.

You can follow Kate on Twitter (@ek_johnston) to learn more about Alderaanian political theory than you really need to know, or on Tumblr (ekjohnston) and Instagram (ek_johnston) if you're just here for pretty pictures.


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Mar 5, 2019

 

International Book Fairs - March 2019

"Nothing warms a book lover’s heart more than a good book. And nothing excites a book addict more than a book fair, overflowing with publishers and booksellers. So, every year we compile for you the dates of the biggest and best book fairs around the world, in the annual Kotobee International Book Fair Calendar.

Take out your calendars and start jotting down dates. This year’s events look spectacular.  The fairs are scattered all over the world, so it’s time to start booking your plane tickets."

By Kotobee on Nov 20, 2018
(reprinted by permission of the site's administrator)



- March 2019 -



Muscat, Oman
February 20 – March 2
According to the Arab Publishers Union, the Muscat International Book Fair is among the best 10 book fairs at the Arab level and one of the top three fairs at the Gulf level in terms of the number of visitors and publishers. Over 650 publishing houses from 27 Arab and foreign countries are taking part in the fair.


Mexico City, Mexico
February 21 — March 4
The annual event helps both the society as a whole and the university community to learn more about the novelties of the Mexican publishing industry. It’s an event held in the historic center of the Mexican capital, Palacio de Minería, for literature enthusiasts. With over six hundred publishing houses and professionals from around the book world coming together and interacting with the public for a fortnight of conferences, readings and book signings. The fair also includes a few concerts. This year’s guest of honor at the fair will be the state of Nuevo León.



Poznań, Poland
March 1 – 3
Books for Children, Young Adults, and Parents is the largest event of its kinds in Poland. A trade fair and cultural event dedicated to the promotion of reading and the development of children’s imagination and sensitivity. The program of events includes numerous discussions, literature reading nights, workshops and creative games for children. The Poznan Book Fair is also an opportunity for children to get autographs from the authors and talk with them during tens of “meet the author” sessions that take place both on publishers’ stands and the main scene.



Dubai, UAE
March 1 – 9
The Emirates Airline Festival of Literature is the Arab World’s largest celebration of the written and spoken word. The Festival places home-grown talent center-stage and offers local fans the chance to interact with world-famous authors, attend literary debates and workshops, and participate in competitions. The Festival’s education outreach program gives students the chance to meet their literary heroes.

In 2019, the Youth Day at the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature will be a celebration of positive thinking, inspiring ideas, and motivating speakers. Open to all young people aged sixteen and over, the festival is a unique opportunity to hear extraordinary talks, engage in fascinating conversations and get inspired.


Moscow, Russia
March 5 – 9
The Moscow International Book Fair will highlight its culture, science, and education through the prism of the book publishing industry and underline the commonality of Slavic cultures. With thousands of book industry professionals and representatives of dozens of countries: booksellers, publishers, translators, journalists, literary agents, and TV and film producers, it is the easiest way to enter not only the Russian book market but also other markets abroad.


New York, USA
March 7 – 10
The ABAA New York International Antiquarian Book Fair brings together a vast selection of rare books, maps, manuscripts, illuminated manuscripts, and ephemera from over 200 American and international dealers. The diversity of specialties includes art, medicine, literature, photography, autographs, first editions, Americana, and much more.


Stockstadt am Rhein, Germany
March 9 ― 10
The Buchmesse im Ried is a supraregional event about books and literature. Hosting the region’s newest leisure and travel guides, the fair boasts of a legendary cake counter. Readers can get in touch with authors, browse books, and view the booths of many publishers and bookstores attend readings and lectures. There are more than 40 publishers and bookstores exhibiting their programs at the fair. The Book Fair in Ried is also hosting the  Stockstädter Wohlfühltage: “Read, Relax, Refuel!”


Bursa, Turkey
March 9 – 17
Bursa is the third largest book fair held by TÜYAP outside Istanbul in terms of the number of visitors and exhibitors. The first fair was held 16 years ago. Up to 350 publishers and nongovernmental organizations will be attending the fair as exhibitors.


London, U.K.
March 12 – 14
The London Book Fair is the global marketplace for rights negotiation and the sale and distribution of content across print, audio, TV, film and digital channels. Staged annually, LBF sees more than 25,000 publishing professionals arrive in London for the week of the Fair to learn, network, and kick off their year of business.

In honor of the LBF’s 48-year anniversary, the London Book Fair and the UK’s Publishing Association have opened submissions for the sixth annual International Excellence Awards in sixteen categories, representing the best publishing ambassadors, innovative publishing, and ground-breaking initiatives in the industry.


Paris, France
March 15 – 18
LivreParis is a popular, festive and friendly event, ideal for families. The book fair is loved by the numerous visitors who come to discover and buy books, enjoy surprise meetings with authors and explore other cultures.
Every year, the Paris Book Fair innovates and creates new themed stages, 2019’s themes are still in the works, so stay tuned to hear more on those.


Leipzig, Germany
March 21 – 24
The Leipzig Book Fair is an important spring meeting place for the publishing and media sector and has evolved into an attractive hallmark both in Germany and across Europe. In a nutshell, the aim of the Leipzig Book Fair is to drum up more publicity for books. Held every March, it’s a massive draw for publishers, writers, readers, and journalists. An ideal communication platform, the Leipzig Book Fair provides extensive information on new publications as well as current and future trends in the German-speaking and European markets.


Alexandria, Egypt
March 25 – April 7
The Bibliotheca Alexandrina is organizing its 15th Alexandria International Book Fair. Participation in the book fair is open only for publishers, members of Union Publishers, representatives of states, and public and international institutions. Distributors are not permitted at the Book Fair. However, a substantial number of publishing and printing houses from Egypt, the Arab World, and Europe are expected to participate.


Milan, Italy
March
Tempo di Libri is organised by Fabbrica del Libro, a joint venture incorporated by Fiera Milano and by Ediser, an Associazione Italiana Editori (Italian Publishers’ Association) service company.


(source: www.kotobee.com - click for the full year list)


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Mar 3, 2019

 

New Monthly Book Releases - March 2019



Time to update your to-be-read list and clear some space on your shelves. These are a few of the new book releases for March 2019.



- Science Fiction -

March 1st:

The Test by Sylvain Neuvel (Paperback, 112 pages, published by St Martin's Press)
Britain, the not-too-distant future. Idir is sitting the British Citizenship Test. He wants his family to belong. Twenty-five questions to determine their fate. Twenty-five chances to impress. When the test takes an unexpected and tragic turn, Idir is handed the power of life and death. How do you value a life when all you have is multiple choice?

March 5th:

Alice Payne Rides (Alice Payne #2) by Kate Heartfield (Paperback, 176 pages, published by Tor.com)
Alice Payne returns in the thrilling sequel to Kate Heartfield's Alice Payne Arrives. After abducting Arthur of Brittany from his own time in 1203, thereby creating the mystery that partly prompted the visit in the first place, Alice and her team discover that they have inadvertently brought the smallpox virus back to 1780 with them. Searching for a future vaccine, Prudence finds that the various factions in the future time war intend to use the crisis to their own advantage. Can the team prevent an international pandemic across time, and put history back on its tracks? At least until the next battle in the time war…

Ancestral Night (White Space #1) by Elizabeth Bear (Hardcover, 512 pages, published by Saga Press)
A space salvager and her partner make the discovery of a lifetime that just might change the universe in this wild, big-ideas space opera from multi award-winning author Elizabeth Bear. Halmey Dz and her partner Connla Kurucz are salvage operators, living just on the inside of the law... usually. Theirs is the perilous and marginal existence—with barely enough chance of striking it fantastically big—just once—to keep them coming back for more. They pilot their tiny ship into the scars left by unsuccessful White Transitions, searching for the relics of lost human and alien vessels. But when they make a shocking discovery about an alien species that has been long thought dead, it may be the thing that could tip the perilous peace mankind has found into full-out war.


Creation Machine (The Spin Trilogy #1) by Andrew Bannister (Paperback, 368 pages, published by Tor Books)
It is the aftermath of civil war in the vast pageant of planets and stars known as The Spin. Three years since he crushed the rebellion, Viklun Haas, industrialist and leader of the Hegemony, is eliminating all remnants of the opposition. Starting with his own daughter. But Fleare Haas, fighter for Society Otherwise has had a long time to plan her next move. Sprung from her remote monastery prison and reuniting with a team of loyal friends, Fleare’s journey will take her across The Spin to the cluster of fallen planets known as the The Catastrophe Curve - and from exile, to the very frontiers of war. Meanwhile, in the brutal and despotic empire of The Fortunate, word is reaching viceroy Alameche of a most unusual piece of plunder from their latest invasion. For hundreds of millions of years, the bizarre planets and stars of The Spin itself have been the only testament to the god-like engineers that created it. Now, buried in the earth of a ruined planet, one of their machines has been found...

Famous Men Who Never Lived by K. Chess (Hardcover, 324 pages, published by Tin House Books)
Wherever Hel looks, New York City is both reassuringly familiar and terribly wrong. As one of the thousands who fled the outbreak of nuclear war in an alternate United States—an alternate timeline—she finds herself living as a refugee in our own not-so-parallel New York. The slang and technology are foreign to her, the politics and art unrecognizable. While others, like her partner Vikram, attempt to assimilate, Hel refuses to reclaim her former career or create a new life. Instead, she obsessively rereads Vikram’s copy of The Pyronauts—a science fiction masterwork in her world that now only exists as a single flimsy paperback—and becomes determined to create a museum dedicated to preserving the remaining artifacts and memories of her vanished culture. But the refugees are unwelcome and Hel’s efforts are met with either indifference or hostility. And when the only copy of The Pyronauts goes missing, Hel must decide how far she is willing to go to recover it and finally face her own anger, guilt, and grief over what she has truly lost.


If This Goes On: The Science Fiction Future of Today’s Politics edited by Cat Rambo (Paperback, 304 pages, published by Parvus Press LLC)
A bold new anthology born of rage and sorrow and hope. 30 writers look at what today's politics and policies will do to shape our world a generation from now. Some of today's most visionary writers of science fiction project us forward to the world of the future; a world shaped by nationalism, isolationism, and a growing divide between the haves and have nots. This anthology sits at the intersection of politics, speculative fiction, and American identity. The choices we make today, the policies of our governments and the values that we, as people, embrace are going to shape our world for decades to come. Or break it. Edited by Cat Rambo, the current President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, the stories of If This Goes On invite you to worlds very like this one-- but just a little different.


Infinite Detail by Tim Maughan (Paperback, 384 pages, published by MCD X Fsg Originals)
A timely and uncanny portrait of a world in the wake of fake news, diminished privacy, and a total shutdown of the Internet. BEFORE: In Bristol's center lies the Croft, a digital no-man's-land cut off from the surveillance, Big Data dependence, and corporate-sponsored, globally hegemonic aspirations that have overrun the rest of the world. Ten years in, it's become a center of creative counterculture. But it's fraying at the edges, radicalizing from inside. How will it fare when its chief architect, Rushdi Mannan, takes off to meet his boyfriend in New York City--now the apotheosis of the new techno-utopian global metropolis? AFTER: An act of anonymous cyberterrorism has permanently switched off the Internet. Global trade, travel, and communication have collapsed. The luxuries that characterized modern life are scarce. In the Croft, Mary--who has visions of people presumed dead--is sought out by grieving families seeking connections to lost ones. But does Mary have a gift or is she just hustling to stay alive? Like Grids, who runs the Croft's black market like personal turf. Or like Tyrone, who hoards music (culled from cassettes, the only medium to survive the crash) and tattered sneakers like treasure. The world of Infinite Detail is a small step shy of our own: utterly dependent on technology, constantly brokering autonomy and privacy for comfort and convenience. With Infinite Detail, Tim Maughan makes the hitherto-unimaginable come true: the End of the Internet, the End of the World as We Know It.


Invisible Ecologies by Rachel Armstrong (Paperback, 264 pages, published by NewCon Press)
Set in a near-future Venice, Invisible Ecologies tells the story of Po, an ambiguously gendered boy born into a community of ocean gypsies who shares an intimate connection with a nascent sentience emerging within the Po delta: the bioregion upon which the city of Venice is founded. The intrepid pair embark on a series of extraordinary adventures and, as Po starts school, stumble upon the Mayor’s drastic plans to modernise the city and reshape the future of the lagoon and its people.


Pure Chocolate: The Chocoverse Book II by Amber Royer (Paperback, 464 pages, published by Angry Robot)
In a galaxy where chocolate is literally addictive, one celebrity chef is fighting back, in the delicious sequel to Free Chocolate. To save everyone she loves, Bo Bonitez is touring Zant, home of the murderous, shark-toothed aliens who so recently tried to eat her. In the midst of her stint as Galactic paparazzi princess, she discovers that Earth has been exporting tainted chocolate to the galaxy, and getting aliens hooked on cocoa. Bo must choose whether to go public, or just smile for the cameras and make it home alive. She's already struggling with her withdrawal from the Invincible Heart, and her love life has a life of its own, but when insidious mind worms intervene, things start to get complicated!

Star Wars: Queen's Shadow (Star Wars Disney Canon Novel) by E.K. Johnston (Hardcover, 352 pages, published by Disney Lucasfilm Press)
When Padmé Naberrie, "Queen Amidala" of Naboo, steps down from her position, she is asked by the newly-elected queen to become Naboo's representative in the Galactic Senate. Padmé is unsure about taking on the new role, but cannot turn down the request to serve her people. Together with her most loyal handmaidens, Padmé must figure out how to navigate the treacherous waters of politics and forge a new identity beyond the queen's shadow.


The Bayern Agenda: Book One of the Galactic Cold War by Dan Moren (Paperback, 384 pages, published by Angry Robot)
A new Cold War threatens the galaxy, in this fast-paced and wisecracking thriller of spies and subterfuge. Simon Kovalic, top intelligence operative for the Commonwealth of Independent Systems, is on the frontline of the burgeoning Cold War with the aggressive Illyrican Empire. He barely escapes his latest mission with a broken arm, and vital intel which points to the Empire cozying up to the Bayern Corporation: a planet-sized bank. There's no time to waste, but with Kovalic out of action, his undercover team is handed over to his ex-wife, Lt Commander Natalie Taylor. When Kovalic's boss is tipped off that the Imperium are ready and waiting, it's up to the wounded spy to rescue his team and complete the mission before they're all caught and executed.

The Last Dog on Earth by Adrian J. Walker (Paperback, 448 pages, published by Sourcebooks Landmark)
Every dog has its day... And for Lineker, a happy go lucky mongrel from London, the day his city falls is finally a chance for adventure. Too bad his master Reg plans to hide himself away from the riots outside... But when an abandoned child shows up looking for help, Reg and his trusty hound must brave the chaos in a journey that will prove not just the importance of bravery, but of loyalty, trust, and finding family in the unlikeliest of places. When the world has gone to the dogs, who will you choose to stand with?


Today I Am Carey by Martin L. Shoemaker (Paperback, 336 pages, published by Baen Books)
Shoemaker proves why he has consistently been praised as one of the best story writers in SF today with this touching, thoughtful, action-packed debut novel, based on his award-winning short story Today I am Paul. TODAY - Mildred has Alzheimer's. As memories fade, she acquires the aid of a full-time android to assist her in everyday life. Carey. Carey takes care of Mildred, but its true mission is to fill in the gaps in Mildred’s past. To bring yesterday into today by becoming a copy. But not merely a copy of a physical person. A copy from the inside out. I AM - After Mildred passes, Carey must find a new purpose. For a time, that purpose is Mildred’s family. To keep them safe from harm. To be of service. There is Paul Owens, the overworked scientist and business leader. Susan Owens, the dedicated teacher. And Millie, a curious little girl who will grow up alongside her android best friend. And Carey will grow up with her. Carey cannot age. But Carey can change. CAREY - Carey struggles. Carey seeks to understand life’s challenges. Carey makes its own path. Carey must learn to live. To grow. To care. To survive. To be.


March 12th:

If, Then by Kate Hope Day (Hardcover, 272 pages, published by Random House)
In the quiet haven of Clearing, Oregon, four neighbors find their lives upended when they begin to see themselves in parallel realities. Ginny, a devoted surgeon whose work often takes precedence over her family, has a baffling vision of a beautiful co-worker in Ginny’s own bed and begins to doubt the solidity of her marriage. Ginny’s husband, Mark, a wildlife scientist, sees a vision that suggests impending devastation and grows increasingly paranoid, threatening the safety of his wife and son. Samara, a young woman desperately mourning the recent death of her mother and questioning why her father seems to be coping with such ease, witnesses an apparition of her mother healthy and vibrant and wonders about the secrets her parents may have kept from her. Cass, a brilliant scholar struggling with the demands of new motherhood, catches a glimpse of herself pregnant again, just as she’s on the brink of returning to the project that could define her career. At first the visions are relatively benign, but they grow increasingly disturbing—and, in some cases, frightening. When a natural disaster threatens Clearing, it becomes obvious that the visions were not what they first seemed and that the town will never be the same. Startling, deeply imagined, and compulsively readable, Kate Hope Day’s debut novel is about the choices we make that shape our lives and determine our destinies—the moments that alter us so profoundly that it feels as if we've entered another reality.


New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction by People of Color edited by Nisi Shawl (Paperback, 384 pages, published by Solaris Books)
New Suns: Original Speculative Fiction by People of Color showcases emerging and seasoned writers of many races telling stories filled with shocking delights, powerful visions of the familiar made strange. Between this book’s covers burn tales of science fiction, fantasy, horror, and their indefinable overlappings. These are authors aware of our many possible pasts and futures, authors freed of stereotypes and clichés, ready to dazzle you with their daring genius. Unexpected brilliance shines forth from every page. Including stories by Indrapramit Das, E Lily Yu, Rebecca Roanhorse, Anil Menon, Jaymee Goh and many others. Introduction by Levar Burton.


Ruin’s Wake by Patrick Edwards (Paperback, 448 pages, published by Titan Books)
A moving and powerful science fiction novel with themes of love, revenge and identity on a totalitarian world. A story about humanity, and the universal search to find salvation in the face of insurmountable odds. An old soldier in exile embarks on a desperate journey to find his dying son. A young woman trapped in an abusive marriage with a government official finds hope in an illicit love. A female scientist uncovers a mysterious technology that reveals that her world is more fragile than she believed. Unification imagines a world ruled by a totalitarian government, where history has been erased and individual identity is replaced by the machinations of the state. As the characters try to save what they hold most dear - in one case a dying son, in the other secret love - their fates converge to a shared destiny.


The Dazzle of Day by Molly Gloss (Paperback, 336 pages, published by Saga Press)
The Dusty Miller, an enormous ring-shaped biosphere towed by an immense solar sail, is coming to the end of its 175 year voyage in search of a better home. But the new world they’ve arrived at is cold and inhospitable; and the Miller’s people have grown comfortable in their self-contained world, its rural shipboard society based on Quaker principles of governance by consensus. While Juko and her family struggle with their own trials and losses, the community faces the death of a sailmender and members of a landing party, as well as a plague that sweeps through the ship. And they all must face the question of whether to attempt settlement of the harsh new planet, or to relaunch the aging and slowly deteriorating Dusty Miller so that another generation might find a more hospitable place. It is, in fact, this same question that caused the Quakers to leave a dying Earth and its oppressive governments in the first place: If an environment is not quite to your liking, do you abandon it in search of another? Make plans to alter it? Or seek ways to accommodate to it?


The Rosewater Insurrection (The Wormwood Trilogy #2) by Tade Thompson (Paperback, 416 pages, published by Orbit Books)
The Rosewater Insurrection continues the award-winning, cutting edge Wormwood trilogy, set in Nigeria, by one of science fiction's most engaging new voices. All is quiet in the city of Rosewater as it expands on the back of the gargantuan alien Wormwood. Those who know the truth of the invasion keep the secret. The government agent Aminat, the lover of the retired sensitive Kaaro, is at the forefront of the cold, silent conflict. She must capture a woman who is the key to the survival of the human race. But Aminat is stymied by the machinations of the Mayor of Rosewater and the emergence of an old enemy of Wormwood...


Tor.com Publishing Editorial Spotlight #3: A Selection of Novellas edited by Ellen Datlow (Ebook Bundle, 568 pages, published by Tor.com)
Tor.com Publishing Editorial Spotlight #3 is a curated selection of novellas by editor Ellen Datlow. This collection includes: The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle; The Twilight Pariah by Jeffrey Ford; Mapping the Interior by Stephen Graham Jones; Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach by Kelly Robson.


March 14th:

The Widening Gyre by Michael R. Johnston (Paperback, 288 pages, published by Flame Tree Press)
Eight hundred years ago, the Zhen Empire discovered a broken human colony ship drifting in the fringes of their space. The Zhen gave the humans a place to live and folded them into their Empire as a client state. But it hasn't been easy. Not all Zhen were eager to welcome another species into their Empire, and humans have faced persecution. For hundreds of years, human languages and history were outlawed subjects, as the Zhen tried to mold humans into their image. Earth and the cultures it nourished for millennia are forgotten, little more than legends. One of the first humans to be allowed to serve in the Zhen military, Tajen Hunt became a war hero at the Battle of Elkari, the only human to be named an official Hero of the Empire. He was given command of a task force, and sent to do the Empire's bidding in their war with the enigmatic Tabrans. But when he failed in a crucial mission, causing the deaths of millions of people, he resigned in disgrace and faded into life on the fringes as a lone independent pilot. When Tajen discovers his brother, Daav, has been killed by agents of the Empire, he, his niece, and their newly-hired crew set out to finish his brother's quest: to find Earth, the legendary homeworld of humanity. What they discover will shatter 800 years of peace in the Empire, and start a war that could be the end of the human race.

March 19th:

Mars by Asja Bakić (Paperback, 144 pages, published by The Feminist Press)
Mars showcases a series of unique and twisted universes, where every character is tasked with making sense of their strange reality. One woman will be freed from purgatory once she writes the perfect book; another abides in a world devoid of physical contact. With wry prose and skewed humor, an emerging feminist writer explores post-Soviet promises of knowledge, freedom, and power.


Moon Rising (Luna #3) by Ian McDonald (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by Tor Books)
The continuing saga of the Moon's Five Dragons, already under option from CBS, a fast-paced, intricately plotted space opera pitched as Game of Thrones meets The Expanse. A hundred years in the future, a war wages between the Five Dragons—five families that control the Moon’s leading industrial companies. Each clan does everything in their power to claw their way to the top of the food chain—marriages of convenience, corporate espionage, kidnapping, and mass assassinations. Through ingenious political manipulation and sheer force of will, Lucas Cortas rises from the ashes of corporate defeat and seizes control of the Moon. The only person who can stop him is a brilliant lunar lawyer, his sister, Ariel. Witness the Dragons' final battle for absolute sovereignty in Ian McDonald's heart-stopping finale to the Luna trilogy.


Permafrost by Alastair Reynolds (Paperback, 176 pages, published by Tor.com)
Fix the past. Save the present. Stop the future. Master of science fiction Alastair Reynolds unfolds a time-traveling climate fiction adventure in Permafrost. 2080: at a remote site on the edge of the Arctic Circle, a group of scientists, engineers and physicians gather to gamble humanity’s future on one last-ditch experiment. Their goal: to make a tiny alteration to the past, averting a global catastrophe while at the same time leaving recorded history intact. To make the experiment work, they just need one last recruit: an ageing schoolteacher whose late mother was the foremost expert on the mathematics of paradox. 2028: a young woman goes into surgery for routine brain surgery. In the days following her operation, she begins to hear another voice in her head... an unwanted presence which seems to have a will, and a purpose, all of its own – one that will disrupt her life entirely. The only choice left to her is a simple one.
Does she resist... or become a collaborator?


Radicalized by Cory Doctorow (Hardcover, 304 pages, published by Tor Books)
Told through one of the most on-pulse genre voices of our generation, Radicalized is a timely novel comprised of four SF novellas connected by social, technological, and economic visions of today and what America could be in the near, near future. Unauthorized Bread is a tale of immigration, the toxicity of economic and technological stratification, and the young and downtrodden fighting against all odds to survive and prosper. In Model Minority, a Superman-like figure attempts to rectify the corruption of the police forces he long erroneously thought protected the defenseless...only to find his efforts adversely affecting their victims. Radicalized is a story of a darkweb-enforced violent uprising against insurance companies told from the perspective of a man desperate to secure funding for an experimental drug that could cure his wife's terminal cancer. The fourth story, Masque of the Red Death, harkens back to Doctorow's Walkaway, taking on issues of survivalism versus community.


Sooner or Later Everything Falls Into the Sea by Sarah Pinsker (Paperback, 288 pages, published by Small Beer Press)
This is one of the most anticipated SF&F collections of recent years. This beautiful, complex debut collection assembles some of Nebula winner Pinsker’s best stories into a twisting journey that is by turns wild, melancholic, and unsettling. In the opening story, an injured farmer adjusts to living with a cybernetic arm that thinks it is a stretch of road in Colorado. “In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind” tells the story of a woman piecing together her husband’s enigmatic past after a stroke leaves him speechless. “No Lonely Seafarer” pits a stablehand against a pair of sirens as he attempts to save his town from its restless sailors. In all of Pinsker’s tales, humans grapple with their relationships to technology, the supernatural, and one another. Some, such as Ms. Clay in “Wind Will Rove,” are trying to navigate the space between technology as preservation and technology as destruction. Others, such as Kima in “Remembery Day,” rely on technology to live their lives. The stories are enhanced by a diverse cast of LGBTQ and nonwhite characters. Pinsker’s captivating compendium reveals stories that are as delightful and surprising to pore through as they are introspective and elegiac.


The Chaos Function by Jack Skillingstead (Hardcover, 304 pages, published by John Joseph Adams/Houghton Mifflin)
For readers of the best‑selling novels Sleeping Giants and Dark Matter, an intense, high‑stakes thriller with a science‑fiction twist that asks: If technology enabled you to save the life of someone you love, would you do so even if it might doom millions? Olivia Nikitas, a hardened journalist whose specialty is war zones, has been reporting from the front lines of the civil war in Aleppo, Syria. When Brian, an aid worker she reluctantly fell in love with, dies while following her into danger, she’ll do anything to bring him back. In a makeshift death chamber beneath an ancient, sacred site, a strange technology is revealed to Olivia: the power to remake the future by changing the past. Following her heart and not her head, Olivia brings Brian back, accidentally shifting the world to the brink of nuclear and biological disaster. Now she must stay steps ahead of the guardians of this technology, who will kill her to reclaim it, in order to save not just herself and her love, but the whole world.


The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley (Hardcover, 356 pages, published by Saga Press)
They said the war would turn us into light. I wanted to be counted among the heroes who gave us this better world. The Light Brigade: it’s what soldiers fighting the war against Mars call the ones who come back… different. Grunts in the corporate corps get busted down into light to travel to and from interplanetary battlefronts. Everyone is changed by what the corps must do in order to break them down into light. Those who survive learn to stick to the mission brief—no matter what actually happens during combat. Dietz, a fresh recruit in the infantry, begins to experience combat drops that don’t sync up with the platoon’s. And Dietz’s bad drops tell a story of the war that’s not at all what the corporate brass want the soldiers to think is going on. Is Dietz really experiencing the war differently, or is it combat madness? Trying to untangle memory from mission brief and survive with sanity intact, Dietz is ready to become a hero—or maybe a villain; in war it’s hard to tell the difference.


The Municipalists by Seth Fried (Paperback, 272 pages, published by Penguin Books)
In Metropolis, the gleaming city of tomorrow, the dream of the great American city has been achieved. But all that is about to change, unless a neurotic, rule-following bureaucrat and an irreverent, freewheeling artificial intelligence can save the city from a mysterious terrorist plot that threatens its very existence. Henry Thompson has dedicated his life to improving America's infrastructure as a proud employee of the United States Municipal Survey. So when the agency comes under attack, he dutifully accepts his unexpected mission to visit Metropolis looking for answers. But his plans to investigate quietly, quickly, and carefully are interrupted by his new partner: a day-drinking know-it-all named OWEN, who also turns out to be the projected embodiment of the agency's supercomputer. Soon, Henry and OWEN are fighting to save not only their own lives and those of the city's millions of inhabitants, but also the soul of Metropolis. The Municipalists is a thrilling, funny, and touching adventure story, a tour-de-force of imagination that trenchantly explores our relationships to the cities around us and the technologies guiding us into the future.


Zero Bomb by M.T. Hill (Paperback, 400 pages, published by Titan Books)
The near future. Following the death of his daughter Martha, Remi flees the north of England for London. Here he tries to rebuild his life as a cycle courier, delivering subversive documents under the nose of an all-seeing state. But when a driverless car attempts to run him over, Remi soon discovers that his old life will not let him move on so easily. Someone is leaving coded messages for Remi across the city, and they seem to suggest that Martha is not dead at all. Unsure what to believe, and increasingly unable to trust his memory, Remi is slowly drawn into the web of a dangerous radical whose '70s sci-fi novel is now a manifesto for direct action against automation, technology, and England itself. The deal? Remi can see Martha again - if he joins the cause.


March 26th:

A Memory Called Empire (Teixcalaan #1) by Arkady Martine (Hardcover, 464 pages, published by Tor Books)
Ambassador Mahit Dzmare arrives in the center of the multi-system Teixcalaanli Empire only to discover that her predecessor, the previous ambassador from their small but fiercely independent mining Station, has died. But no one will admit that his death wasn't an accident--or that Mahit might be next to die, during a time of political instability in the highest echelons of the imperial court. Now, Mahit must discover who is behind the murder, rescue herself, and save her Station from Teixcalaan's unceasing expansion--all while navigating an alien culture that is all too seductive, engaging in intrigues of her own, and hiding a deadly technological secret--one that might spell the end of her Station and her way of life--or rescue it from annihilation.


Koko Uncaged (Koko #3) by Kieran Shea (Paperback, 320 pages, published by Titan Books)
Surviving job loss, an unsettled vendetta, a submarine wreck, heartbreak, and mortal carnage on a tokusatsu scale, Koko P. Martstellar (ex-corporate mercenary and saloon/brothel owner) is trying to reassemble what's left of her life. Being hired to protect global industrialist Bogart Gong seems like as good a place to start as any, but bodyguard work isn't the cakewalk Koko thought it'd be. Throw in some autocratic malfeasance, a hatchet man with a flair for the dramatic, a South American despot, lovers back from the grave, and a high-speed race at a prison, and you've a brain-melting cocktail of cyberpunk satire that's impossible to put down.

The Artificial Man and Other Stories edited by Clare Winger Harris (Paperback, 384 pages, published by Belt Publishing)
The early twentieth century pulp stories of author Clare Winger Harris influenced the boom of modern writers such as Ursula K. Le Guin and Margaret Atwood. In this new collection, author and scholar Brad Ricca assembles ten of Harris’s greatest short stories, including “The Fifth Dimension,” “The Fate of the Poseidonia,” “The Menace of Mars,” and “The Vibrometer.”

Tiamat's Wrath (The Expanse #8) by James S.A. Corey (Hardcover, 608 pages, published by Orbit Books)
Thirteen hundred gates have opened to solar systems around the galaxy. But as humanity builds its interstellar empire in the alien ruins, the mysteries and threats grow deeper. In the dead systems where gates lead to stranger things than alien planets, Elvi Okoye begins a desperate search to discover the nature of a genocide that happened before the first human beings existed, and to find weapons to fight a war against forces at the edge of the imaginable. But the price of that knowledge may be higher than she can pay. At the heart of the empire, Teresa Duarte prepares to take on the burden of her father's godlike ambition. The sociopathic scientist Paolo Cortázar and the Mephistophelian prisoner James Holden are only two of the dangers in a palace thick with intrigue, but Teresa has a mind of her own and secrets even her father the emperor doesn't guess. And throughout the wide human empire, the scattered crew of the Rocinante fights a brave rear-guard action against Duarte's authoritarian regime. Memory of the old order falls away, and a future under Laconia's eternal rule -- and with it, a battle that humanity can only lose - seems more and more certain. Because against the terrors that lie between worlds, courage and ambition will not be enough...


• • • •

- Fantasy -

March 5th:

Another Kingdom (Another Kingdom #1) by Andrew Klavan (Hardcover, 352 pages, published by Turner Publishing)
Austin Lively is a struggling, disillusioned screenwriter whose life is suddenly changed forever when he opens a door and is unwittingly transported to a fantastical medieval realm. Austin finds himself wielding a bloody dagger while standing over a very beautiful and very dead woman. Bewildered and confused, he is seized by castle guards and thrown in a dungeon. Just when he begins to fear the worst he is suddenly transported back to reality in LA. Did that really just happened? Has he gone insane? Was it all a dream? Did he have a brain tumor? Desperate for answers, sets out to find them and discovers that the mystery can only be unlocked by a strange piece of fiction that holds the truth about the magical kingdom. But he isn’t the only person searching for the missing manuscript, and his rivals will stop at nothing to get it first. To complicate matters more, Austin soon discovers that he has no control over when he passes between worlds, and finds himself out of trust for even the simple things, like walking through doorways. Stuck between dual realities –charged for a murder he doesn’t recall in one and running from a maniacal billionaire who’s determined to kill him in another– Austin’s monotonous life has become an epic adventure of magic, murder, and political intrigue in both the New Republic of Galiana and the streets of Los Angeles California.

Gristle: Weird Tales by Jordan A. Rothacker (Paperback, 134 pages, published by Stalking Horse Press)
Gristle is alchemical theatre, a collection of weird tales, twelve fingers on the steering wheel, with D.H.Lawrence and Sylvia Plath asleep across the back seat, Chekov shivering on the hard shoulder…Gristle is a post-beat riddle, a comedy, a nightmare… Gristle is Salinger descending from his eyrie with a bottle of Thunderbird. Jordan A. Rothacker hasstolen a dream car… The road doubles back upon itself, but the riders are still lost. Sincerity and foolishness glow from the map. Follow, follow, the Moon is over the blacktop and the canny ghosts and story serpents are coming out…


Jacked Cat Jive (Kai Gracen #3) by Rhys Ford (Paperback, 352 pages, published by DSP Publications)
Stalker Kai Gracen knew his human upbringing would eventually clash with his elfin heritage, but not so soon. Between Ryder, a pain-in-his-neck Sidhe Lord coaxing him to join San Diego’s Southern Rise Court, and picking up bounties for SoCalGov, he has more than enough to deal with. With his loyalties divided between the humans who raised him and the Sidhe Lord he’s befriended and sworn to protect, Kai finds himself standing at a crossroads. When a friend begs Kai to rescue a small group of elfin refugees fleeing the Dusk Court, he’s pulled into a dangerous mission with Ryder through San Diego’s understreets and the wilderness beyond. Things go from bad to downright treacherous when Kerrick, Ryder’s cousin, insists on joining them, staking a claim on Southern Rise and Kai. Burdened by his painful past, Kai must stand with Ryder against Kerrick while facing down the very Court he fears and loathes. Dying while on a run is expected for a Stalker, but Kai wonders if embracing his elfin blood also means losing his heart, soul, and humanity along the way.

Mahimata (Asiana #2) by Rati Mehrotra (Paperback, 480 pages, published by Harper Voyager)
A young female assassin must confront the man who slaughtered her family, risk her heart, and come to terms with her identity as a warrior and as a woman in this thrilling fantasy from the author of Markswoman. Kyra has returned to the caves of Kali, but her homecoming is bittersweet. She no longer knows what her place is. Her beloved teacher is dead and her best friend Nineth is missing. And gone, too, is Rustan, the Marksman who helped her train for the duel with Tamsyn--and became far more than a teacher and friend. Shaken by his feelings for Kyra and the truth about his parentage, Rustan has set off on a quest for answers. His odyssey leads him to the descendants of an ancient sect tied to the alien Ones--and the realization that the answers he seeks come with a price. Yet fate has plans to bring Kyra and Rustan together again. Kai Tau, the man who slaughtered Kyra’s family, wages war on the Orders of Asiana. Hungering for justice, Kyra readies herself for battle, aided by her new companions: the wyr-wolves, who are so much more than what they seem. And determined to keep the woman he loves safe, Rustan joins the fight to ride by her side. But will this final confrontation ultimately cost them their love... and their lives?


Prism Cloud (Harbinger #4) by Jeff Wheeler (Paperback, 362 pages, published by 47North)
When the emperor is assassinated, Sera Fitzempress is the noble most eligible to inherit the empire. Her upcoming marriage to the prince would cement her position. And as a champion for peace, Sera is the only promise of hope for staving off war between the worlds of Kingfountain and Muirwood. But standing between her and her enemies is just one devastating secret. Sera’s best friend, Cettie, a girl born of a lower class, has made a shattering discovery: her entire existence has been a lie. Now Cettie must give up the only life she’s known and fought for and leave behind the man she loves to stop Sera’s wedding. For this discovery could bring the whole of Kingfountain to ruin. As Cettie struggles to determine her true loyalties and loves, her allies fall to wicked plots, and she becomes increasingly alone on her journey to a destiny she never wanted—one that could ignite an unstoppable war.

String City by Graham Edwards (Paperback, 320 pages, published by Solaris Books)
A hard-boiled, interdimensional detective romp of high suspense and action. THE UNIVERSE IS MADE OF STRING. WHEN THE KNOTS TIGHTEN, THE COSMOS QUAKES. It’s a tough job being a gumshoe in an interdimensional city full of gods, living concepts and weirder things. Good thing I’m a stringwalker, able to jump between realities. It started when I was hired to investigate an explosion at a casino. A simple heist, I thought, but it turned into a race to stop the apocalypse. So I rolled the dice, and now I’m up against the ancient Greek Titans, an interdimensional spider god and a mysterious creature known as the Fool. I’m going to need more than just luck to solve this one. If I fail, all things—in all realities—could be destroyed. Just another day in String City.


Superman: Dawnbreaker (DC Icons #4) by Matt de la Pena (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Random House Books for Young Readers)
When the dawn breaks, a hero rises. His power is beyond imagining. Clark Kent has always been faster, stronger--better--than everyone around him. But he wasn't raised to show off, and drawing attention to himself could be dangerous. Plus, it's not like he's earned his powers... yet. But power comes with a price. Lately it's difficult to hold back and keep his heroics in the shadows. When Clark follows the sound of a girl crying, he comes across Gloria Alvarez and discovers a dark secret lurking in Smallville. Turns out, Clark's not the only one hiding something. Teaming up with his best friend, Lana Lang, he throws himself into the pursuit of the truth. What evil lies below the surface of his small town? And what will it cost Clark to learn about his past as he steps into the light to become the future Man of Steel? Because before he can save the world, he must save Smallville.


That Ain't Witchcraft (InCryptid #8) by Seanan McGuire (Paperback, 448 pages, published by Daw Books)
The eighth book in the funny and fast-paced InCryptid urban fantasy series returns to the mishaps of the Price family, eccentric cryptozoologists who safeguard the world of magical creatures living in secret among humans. Crossroads, noun: 1. A place where two roads cross. 2. A place where bargains can be made. 3. See also "places to avoid." Antimony Price has never done well without a support system. As the youngest of her generation, she has always been able to depend on her parents, siblings, and cousins to help her out when she's in a pinch--until now. After fleeing from the Covenant of St. George, she's found herself in debt to the crossroads and running for her life. No family. No mice. No way out. Lucky for her, she's always been resourceful, and she's been gathering allies as she travels: Sam, fūri trapeze artist turned boyfriend; Cylia, jink roller derby captain and designated driver; Fern, sylph friend, confidant, and maker of breakfasts; even Mary, ghost babysitter to the Price family. Annie's actually starting to feel like they might be able to figure things out--which is probably why things start going wrong again. New Gravesend, Maine is a nice place to raise a family... or make a binding contract with the crossroads. For James Smith, whose best friend disappeared when she tried to do precisely that, it's also an excellent place to plot revenge. Now the crossroads want him dead and they want Annie to do the dirty deed. She owes them, after all. And that's before Leonard Cunningham, aka, "the next leader of the Covenant," shows up... It's going to take everything Annie has and a little bit more to get out of this one. If she succeeds, she gets to go home. If she fails, she becomes one more cautionary tale about the dangers of bargaining with the crossroads. But no pressure.


The Far Far Better Thing: Saga of the Redeemed: Book IV by Auston Habershaw (Ebook, 432 pages, published by Harper Voyager Impulse)
Auston Habershaw's epic fantasy series, The Saga of the Redeemed, which began with  The Oldest Trick, comes to a powerful conclusion in The Far Far Better Thing. War has come to Eretheria. With Tyvian Reldamar feigning his death, the forces that still carry his banner are left to fight a vicious battle against the warlord Banric Sahand and the noble houses that flock to his side. Led by Myreon and Artus, this band of freedom fighters and angry rebels is faced with an enemy the likes of which they’ve never faced before: one who will do anything, no matter how brutal, to secure victory. Having had his fill of death, Tyvian tries to run away from the war fought in his name, but it just isn’t that simple. With his mother held prisoner, Artus and Myreon in grave danger, and Xahlven pulling the strings in the background, the ring drags Tyvian to return and set things right. But how can one man fix a world this broken? And what will be left behind when the smoke clears? No one can say for sure. Least of all Tyvian.


The Women's War (Women's War #1) by Jenna Glass (Hardcover, 560 pages, published by Del Rey Books)
In a high fantasy feminist epic, a revolutionary spell gives women the ability to control their own fertility—with consequences that rock their patriarchal society to its core. When a nobleman’s first duty is to produce a male heir, women are treated like possessions and bargaining chips. But as the aftereffects of a world-altering spell ripple out physically and culturally, women at last have a bargaining chip of their own. And two women in particular find themselves at the crossroads of change. Alys is the widowed mother of two teenage children, and the disinherited daughter of a king. Her existence has been carefully proscribed, but now she discovers a fierce talent not only for politics but also for magic—once deemed solely the domain of men. Meanwhile, in a neighboring kingdom, young Ellin finds herself unexpectedly on the throne after the sudden death of her grandfather the king and everyone else who stood ahead of her in the line of succession. Conventional wisdom holds that she will marry quickly, then quietly surrender the throne to her new husband…. Only, Ellin has other ideas. The tensions building in the two kingdoms grow abruptly worse when a caravan of exiled women and their escort of disgraced soldiers stumbles upon a new source of magic in what was once uninhabitable desert. This new and revolutionary magic—which only women can wield—threatens to tear down what is left of the patriarchy. And the men who currently hold power will do anything to fight back.


Wild Country (The World of the Others #2) by Anne Bishop (Hardcover, 496 pages, published by Ace Books)
There are ghost towns in the world—places where the humans were annihilated in retaliation for the slaughter of the shape-shifting Others. One of those places is Bennett, a town at the northern end of the Elder Hills—a town surrounded by the wild country. Now efforts are being made to resettle Bennett as a community where humans and Others live and work together. A young female police officer has been hired as the deputy to a Wolfgard sheriff. A deadly type of Other wants to run a human-style saloon. And a couple with four foster children—one of whom is a blood prophet—hope to find acceptance. But as they reopen the stores and the professional offices and start to make lives for themselves, the town of Bennett attracts the attention of other humans looking for profit. And the arrival of the Blackstone Clan, outlaws and gamblers all, will uncover secrets… or bury them.


March 12th:

Bloodleaf (Bloodleaf #1) by Crystal Smith (Hardcover, 384 pages, published by HMH Books for Young Readers)
Aurelia is the first princess born to the Renalten crown in two hundred years, destined to fulfill a treaty by journeying to marry Valentin, the prince of Achelva – Renalt’s greatest enemy. Rumors of an unwell, cruel prince abound, and the only thing that eclipses Aurelia’s apprehension of her impending marriage is her fear of those who’d kill her to prevent it. When an assassination attempt forces Aurelia to use forbidden magic to save a stranger, she is driven from Renalt by the witch-hunting Tribunal and a mob out for blood. But before she can claim asylum in the court of her betrothed, her travel party turns on her, forcing her to trade places with her treacherous lady-in-waiting, Lisette. Now penniless in Achleva and bereft of her identity, Aurelia must decide if she wants to surrender to her new life or fight for her old one, all while navigating the complicated ties binding her to the enigmatic prince, the unquiet ghost of an ancient queen, and a poisonous plant called bloodleaf. Aurelia is a pawn in a centuries-long game of love, power, and war— and if she can’t extricate herself from it before Lisette marries Valentin in her stead, she may face losses far more devastating than her crown.


Dawn of the Exile (Infernal Guardian #2) by Mitchell Hogan (Paperback, 396 pages, published by 47North)
For the damned, redemption may be just a mad dream… Years have passed since the demon Tarrik and his master, the sorcerer Ren, destroyed the servants of Samal and suppressed the very essence of the vile lord. The cost was greater than even a demon could have imagined. But in the realms of demons and humans, no evil can be fully controlled, and no one’s true fate can be foretold. Including Tarrik’s. He’s been summoned once more, now by the vengeful Linriel, who’s fallen in with one of Samal’s ravaged survivors. Linriel takes Tarrik, bound again to serve, on a journey to the harsh southern lands to find the source of Ren’s coveted powers, and there they discover a part of Tarrik’s past he thought had been lost forever. As old bindings more powerful than sorcery fetter him, Tarrik is drawn into an obsessive and insane mission to erase the demon lord Samal from existence forever. And only if he succeeds will he at last be freed from exile. As old threats are reborn, he must decide what sacrifices he’s willing to make and what risks he’s willing to take on the unforgiving road to redemption.

The Bird King by G. Willow Wilson (Hardcover, 440 pages, published by Grove Press)
Set in 1491 during the reign of the last sultanate in the Iberian peninsula, The Bird King is the story of Fatima, the only remaining Circassian concubine to the sultan, and her dearest friend Hassan, the palace mapmaker. Hassan has a secret--he can draw maps of places he's never seen and bend the shape of reality. When representatives of the newly formed Spanish monarchy arrive to negotiate the sultan's surrender, Fatima befriends one of the women, not realizing that she will see Hassan's gift as sorcery and a threat to Christian Spanish rule. With their freedoms at stake, what will Fatima risk to save Hassan and escape the palace walls? As Fatima and Hassan traverse Spain with the help of a clever jinn to find safety, The Bird King asks us to consider what love is and the price of freedom at a time when the West and the Muslim world were not yet separate.


The Near Witch (The Near Witch #1) by Victoria Schwab (Hardcover, 320 pages, published by Titan Books)
All-new deluxe edition of an out-of-print gem, containing in-universe short story “The Ash-Born Boy” and a never-before-seen introduction from V.E. Schwab. The Near Witch is only an old story told to frighten children. If the wind calls at night, you must not listen. The wind is lonely, and always looking for company. There are no strangers in the town of Near. These are the truths that Lexi has heard all her life. But when an actual stranger, a boy who seems to fade like smoke, appears outside her home on the moor at night, she knows that at least one of these sayings is no longer true. The next night, the children of Near start disappearing from their beds, and the mysterious boy falls under suspicion. As the hunt for the children intensifies, so does Lexi’s need to know about the witch that just might be more than a bedtime story, about the wind that seems to speak through the walls at night, and about the history of this nameless boy.


The True Queen (Sorcerer Royal #2) by Zen Cho (Paperback, 384 pages, published by Ace Books)
When sisters Muna and Sakti wake up on the peaceful beach of the island of Janda Baik, they can’t remember anything, except that they are bound as only sisters can be. They have been cursed by an unknown enchanter, and slowly Sakti starts to fade away. The only hope of saving her is to go to distant Britain, where the Sorceress Royal has established an academy to train women in magic. If Muna is to save her sister, she must learn to navigate high society, and trick the English magicians into believing she is a magical prodigy. As she's drawn into their intrigues, she must uncover the secrets of her past, and journey into a world with more magic than she had ever dreamed.


Titanshade by Dan Stout (Hardcover, 416 pages, published by Daw Books)
This noir fantasy thriller from a debut author introduces the gritty town of Titanshade, where danger lurks around every corner. Carter's a homicide cop in Titanshade, an oil boomtown where 8-tracks are state of the art, disco rules the radio, and all the best sorcerers wear designer labels. It's also a metropolis teetering on the edge of disaster. As its oil reserves run dry, the city's future hangs on a possible investment from the reclusive amphibians known as Squibs. But now negotiations have been derailed by the horrific murder of a Squib diplomat. The pressure's never been higher to make a quick arrest, even as Carter's investigation leads him into conflict with the city's elite. Undermined by corrupt coworkers and falsified evidence, and with a suspect list that includes power-hungry politicians, oil magnates, and mad scientists, Carter must find the killer before the investigation turns into a witch-hunt and those closest to him pay the ultimate price on the filthy streets of Titanshade.


March 15th:

Gunsmoke & Dragonfire: A Fantasy Western Anthology edited by Diane Morrison (Kindle Edition, 567 pages, published by Aradia Publishing)
From the drought-plagued plains of Mars, to a post-apocalyptic Canada, to the familiar American West and Mexico, to other dimensions and other worlds weird and wonderful, an international cast of bestselling, award-winning, established, and emerging authors brings you 25 strange western tales: We invite you to explore these stories in the grand pulp fiction tradition: from weird westerns, to sci-fi and space westerns, to post-apocalyptic westerns, alternate history, time travel, and cattlepunk. Featuring a classic Solomon Kane story by Robert E. Howard.


March 19th:

Boundary Broken (Boundary Magic #4) by Melissa F. Olson (Paperback, 350 pages, published by 47North)
Years ago, boundary witch Allison “Lex” Luther made a promise to an alpha werewolf. Now, just when the supernatural community in Colorado is enjoying a period of hard-won peace, the alpha turns up at Lex’s door to call in his marker. Two of his pack members have disappeared in the Colorado sand dunes, and he needs safe passage to hunt for them. With her friend Simon Pellar along for backup, Lex ventures into the dunes to search for the missing couple… but what they find is only the opening move in an ambitious assault against those who hold power in the Colorado Old World. An old enemy has returned to tear their peace apart, and Lex is soon embroiled in politics she doesn’t understand, from a time before she had magic. To save her friends and her way of life, Lex will have to cross every line she’s drawn since learning what she is—and it may still be too late.

Soulkeeper (The Keepers #1) by David Dalglish (Paperback, 704 pages,  published by Orbit Books)
In the first book of USA Today bestseller David Dalglish's epic fantasy trilogy a warrior priest must answer the call and protect his world from monsters that were once only legend when ancient magic suddenly returns to his land. Devin Eveson is a Soulkeeper, traveling through remote villages as a preacher and healer. But when a dragon awakens--the size of a mountain and leaving great chasms in its wake--the veil is torn, flooding the land with ancient magic and forgotten races. Now Devin must set aside his words of peace and accept his new role: slayer of monsters and protector of the human race. But not all the creatures that have re-awakened mean humanity harm. And as Devin slowly befriends people of these new races, his discomfort in his role grows. But Soulkeepers must slay without mercy. And even sympathizers risk their wrath.


The Deepest Blue (Tales of Renthia) by Sarah Beth Durst (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by Harper Voyager)
The natural magic of the classic The Island of the Blue Dolphins meets the danger and courage of The Hunger Games in this dazzling, intricate stand-alone fantasy novel set in award-winning author Sarah Beth Durst’s beloved world of Renthia. Life is precious and precarious on the islands of Belene. Besieged by a capricious ocean full of malicious spirits, the people of the islands seek joy where they can. Mayara, one of the island’s fearless oyster divers, has found happiness in love. But on the day of her wedding to the artist Kelo, a spirit-driven storm hits the island with deadly force. To save her loved ones, Mayara reveals a dangerous secret: she has the power to control the spirits. When the storm ends, she is taken into custody by the queen’s soldiers and imprisoned with other women like her. They vary in age and social status, but to many they are heroes who will aide the country or witches that will sacrifice themselves trying. No matter who they are, the women are sent to a terrifying place—an island filled with bloodthirsty nature spirits, and left without food, water, shelter, or any tools except their own instincts and magic. Whoever survives the Island of Testing will be declared heirs to the queen. But no matter if she wins or loses, Mayara knows that the life she dreamed of is gone.


The Perfect Assassin (The Chronicles of Ghadid #1) by K.A. Doore (Paperback, 352 pages, published by Tor Books)
Divine justice is written in blood. Or so Amastan has been taught. As a new assassin in the Basbowen family, he’s already having second thoughts about taking a life. A scarcity of contracts ends up being just what he needs. Until, unexpectedly, Amastan finds the body of a very important drum chief. Until, impossibly, Basbowen’s finest start showing up dead, with their murderous jaan running wild in the dusty streets of Ghadid. Until, inevitably, Amastan is ordered to solve these murders, before the family gets blamed. Every life has its price, but when the tables are turned, Amastan must find this perfect assassin or be their next target.


The Witch’s Kind by Louisa Morgan (Hardcover, 448 pages, published by Redhook)
Barrie Anne Blythe and her aunt Charlotte have always known that the other residents of their small coastal community find them peculiar -- two women living alone on the outskirts of town. It is the price of concealing their strange and dangerous family secret. But two events threaten to upend their lives forever. The first is the arrival of a mysterious abandoned baby with a hint of power like their own. The second is the sudden reappearance of Barrie Anne's long-lost husband -- who is not quite the man she thought she married. Together, Barrie Anne and Charlotte must decide how far they are willing to go to protect themselves -- and the child they think of as their own -- from suspicious neighbors, the government, and even their own family...

Unfettered III (Unfettered #3) by Shawn Speakman (Hardcover, 480 pages, published by Grim Oak Press)
Lacking health insurance when he was diagnosed with cancer, Shawn Speakman asked friends in the science fiction and fantasy writing community to donate short stories he could use to counter mounting medical debt. The result was Unfettered, an anthology offering tales from some of the best authors working today. Now, in Unfettered III, Speakman continues to pay forward the aid he received, raising money to combat medical debt for SF&F artists and authors. He has gathered together a great mix of new and favorite writers―free to write what they like―the result a powerful new anthology perfect for all readers. Be haunted by the chilling ghost story of Megan Lindholm. Revisit the world of the Magicians with Lev Grossman. Return to Osten Ard in an epic first look at Tad Williams’s Empire of Grass. Callie Bates shares a heartfelt story of magical loss and gain. Cross the sands of the desert planet Dune with Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. Travel the Ways with Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson. And many more stories, all wondrous alongside beautiful art by Todd Lockwood and Kaitlund Zupanic! Unfettered III is sure to astound with the magic bound within its pages. All the while raising money for a charitable cause. Because protecting our artists and authors is as important as the stories they tell.


March 26th:

A Parliament of Bodies (The Maradaine Constabulary #3) by Marshall Ryan Maresca (Paperback, 400 pages, published by Daw Books)
Mixing high fantasy and mystery, the third book in the Maradaine Constabulary series follows Inspectors Satrine Rainey and Minox Welling as they track down a dangerous murderer. The city of Maradaine is vexed by the Gearbox Murders: a series of gruesome deaths orchestrated by a twisted mechanical genius. With no motive and no pattern, Inspectors Satrine Rainey and Minox Welling--the retired spy and untrained mage--are at a loss to find a meaningful lead in the case. At least, until the killer makes his most audacious exhibit yet: over a dozen victims in a clockwork deathtrap on the floor of the Druth Parliament. The crime scene is a madhouse, and political forces conspire to grind their investigation to a halt. The King's Marshals claim jurisdiction of the case, corruption in the Constabulary thwarts their efforts, and a special Inquest threatens to end Minox's career completely. Their only ally is Dayne Heldrin, a provisional member of the Tarian Order, elite warriors trained in the art of protection. But Dayne's connection to the Gearbox Murders casts suspicion on his motives, as he might be obsessed with a phantom figure he believes is responsible. While Satrine and Minox struggle to stop the Gearbox from claiming even more victims, the grinding gears of injustice might keep them from ever solving these murders, and threaten to dismantle their partnership forever.


Black City Dragon (Black City Saint #3) by Richard A. Knaak (Paperback, 336 pages, published by Pyr Books)
A historical urban fantasy set in Prohibition-era Chicago, which combines action, mystery, and romance against a backdrop of gangland wars and the threat of supernatural horror. For sixteen hundred years, Nick Medea has guarded the gate between our world and Feirie, preventing the Wyld--the darkest Feirie of all--from coming into Chicago to find human prey. But since he defeated Oberon, more and more Wyld have been slipping through. Nick and his Feirie companion, the shapeshifter, Fetch, have been busy hunting them down. Nick keeps coming across the Dacian Draco, the sign of his ancient enemy Galerius, including a tattoo worn by a human thug. Unfortunately, every trail ends as if years old. Claryce, Nick's reincarnated love, has narrowly escaped two attempts on her life, and when Nick sees her wearing a broach with the Draco on it, he knows they must look more deeply into her former lives. With Wyld and gangsters wreaking havoc in Chicago, Nick and Claryce must confront the secrets of their pasts if they are to have any hope of finding out Galerius's plans before it's too late to stop them. Nick will need the help of all his friends, both human and Feirie, and the powers of the dragon within him, to keep Galerius from endangering the gate, Chicago, and all of humanity.


Miranda in Milan by Katharine Duckett (Paperback, 208 pages, published by Tor.com)
With Miranda in Milan, debut author Katharine Duckett reimagines the consequences of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, casting Miranda into a Milanese pit of vipers and building a queer love story that lifts off the page in whirlwinds of feeling. After the tempest, after the reunion, after her father drowned his books, Miranda was meant to enter a brave new world. Naples awaited her, and Ferdinand, and a throne. Instead she finds herself in Milan, in her father’s castle, surrounded by hostile servants who treat her like a ghost. Whispers cling to her like spiderwebs, whispers that carry her dead mother’s name. And though he promised to give away his power, Milan is once again contorting around Prospero’s dark arts. With only Dorothea, her sole companion and confidant to aid her, Miranda must cut through the mystery and find the truth about her father, her mother, and herself.


Once & Future (Once & Future #1) by Amy Rose Capetta & Cori McCarthy (Paperback, 368 pages, published by Rock the Boat)
I’ve been chased my whole life. As a fugitive refugee in the territory controlled by the tyrannical Mercer corporation, I’ve always had to hide who I am. Until I found Excalibur. Now I’m done hiding. My name is Ari Helix. I have a magic sword, a cranky wizard, and a revolution to start. When Ari crash-lands on Old Earth and pulls a magic sword from its ancient resting place, she is revealed to be the newest reincarnation of King Arthur. Then she meets Merlin, who has aged backward over the centuries into a teenager, and together they must break the curse that keeps Arthur coming back. Their quest? Defeat the cruel, oppressive government and bring peace and equality to all humankind. No pressure.


The Warrior (The Immortal Dealers #3) by Sarah Fine (Paperback, 300 pages, published by 47North)
For those who deal in the fate of the world, salvation and destruction are not games of chance. Ernestine “Ernie” Terwilliger never intended to live among the Immortal Dealers, much less to be party to an ongoing battle where the fate of humanity is in the draw of a card. And the stakes have gotten only higher now that a shady new Forger has been crowned. Virginia may be in charge of creating the chaos that makes the universe tick, but her assignments have been noble—each one in the aid of strangers. But when Ernie discovers Virginia’s true purpose, she realizes it’s going to take an entirely new kind of play to stop her. The game changer lies within a mysterious artifact dredged from the ocean. To unlock its powers, Ernie and her partner, Gabe, must traverse dangerous new realms and uncover the history of Forgers past. Joined in a tenuous alliance with a former enemy and stalked by old friends turned lethal foes, Ernie had better play her cards right—because this time, the whole universe could be destroyed in the shuffle.


March 28th:

Fluffy’s Revolution by Ted Myers (Paperback, 146 pages, published by Black Rose Writing)
The fate of the world rests on the haunches of one small cat.
It's 2135. Fluffy is a super-intelligent GAB (Genetically Altered Brain) cat. Like many dogs, cats, mice, and the occasional pig, her brain is the product of genetic tinkering by humans that started more than a century ago. With their powers of telekinesis, the animals can manipulate physical objects without being able to grasp them. They can speak to each other telepathically without audible voices. Now, people have begun to fear them and to systematically capture and exterminate them. Fluffy leaves the safety of her home to look for her lost brother and joins a band of animal revolutionaries. After a series of brushes with death, Fluffy and her friends find a secret university for GAB animals. There, they work with enlightened humans to save Earth from certain destruction.


• • • •

- Historical Fiction -

March 1st:

What the Wind Knows by Amy Harmon (Paperback, 416 pages, published by Lake Union Publishing)
In an unforgettable love story, a woman’s impossible journey through the ages could change everything…. Anne Gallagher grew up enchanted by her grandfather’s stories of Ireland. Heartbroken at his death, she travels to his childhood home to spread his ashes. There, overcome with memories of the man she adored and consumed by a history she never knew, she is pulled into another time. The Ireland of 1921, teetering on the edge of war, is a dangerous place in which to awaken. But there Anne finds herself, hurt, disoriented, and under the care of Dr. Thomas Smith, guardian to a young boy who is oddly familiar. Mistaken for the boy’s long-missing mother, Anne adopts her identity, convinced the woman’s disappearance is connected to her own. As tensions rise, Thomas joins the struggle for Ireland’s independence and Anne is drawn into the conflict beside him. Caught between history and her heart, she must decide whether she’s willing to let go of the life she knew for a love she never thought she’d find. But in the end, is the choice actually hers to make?


March 5th:

Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Paperback, 368 pages, published by Hutchinson)
In 1979, Daisy Jones and The Six split up. Together, they had redefined the 70’s music scene, creating an iconic sound that rocked the world. Apart, they baffled a world that had hung on their every verse. This book is an attempt to piece together a clear portrait of the band’s rise to fame and their abrupt and infamous split. The following oral history is a compilation of interviews, emails, transcripts, and lyrics, all pertaining to the personal and professional lives of the members of the band The Six and singer Daisy Jones. While I have aimed for a comprehensive and exhaustive approach, I must acknowledge that full and complete accounts from all parties involved has proved impossible. Some people were easier to track down than others, some were more willing to talk than others, and some, unfortunately, have passed on. All of which is to say that while this is the first and only authorised account from all represented perspectives, it should be noted that, in matters both big and small, reasonable people disagree. The truth often lies, unclaimed, in the middle.


In Another Time by Jillian Cantor (Paperback, 336 pages, published by Harper Perennial)
A sweeping historical novel that spans Germany, England, and the United States and follows a young couple torn apart by circumstance leading up to World War II—and the family secret that may prove to be the means for survival. Love brought them together. But only time can save them… 1931, Germany. Bookshop owner Max Beissinger meets Hanna Ginsberg, a budding concert violinist, and immediately he feels a powerful chemistry between them. It isn’t long before they fall in love and begin making plans for the future. As their love affair unfolds over the next five years, the climate drastically changes in Germany as Hitler comes to power. Their love is tested with the new landscape and the realities of war, not the least of which is that Hanna is Jewish and Max is not. But unbeknownst to Hanna is the fact that Max has a secret, which causes him to leave for months at a time—a secret that Max is convinced will help him save Hanna if Germany becomes too dangerous for her because of her religion. In 1946, Hanna Ginsberg awakens in a field outside of Berlin. Disoriented and afraid, she has no memory of the past ten years and no idea what has happened to Max. With no information as to Max’s whereabouts—or if he is even still alive—she decides to move to London to live with her sister while she gets her bearings. Even without an orchestra to play in, she throws herself completely into her music to keep alive her lifelong dream of becoming a concert violinist. But the music also serves as a balm to heal her deeply wounded heart and she eventually gets the opening she long hoped for. Even so, as the days, months, and years pass, taking her from London to Paris to Vienna to America, she continues to be haunted by her forgotten past, and the fate of the only man she has ever loved and cannot forget. Told in alternating viewpoints—Max in the years leading up to WWII, and Hanna in the ten years after—In Another Time is a beautiful novel about love and survival, passion and music, across time and continents.


The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See (Hardcover, 384 pages, published by Scribner)
Mi-ja and Young-sook, two girls living on the Korean island of Jeju, are best friends that come from very different backgrounds. When they are old enough, they begin working in the sea with their village’s all-female diving collective, led by Young-sook’s mother. As the girls take up their positions as baby divers, they know they are beginning a life of excitement and responsibility but also danger. Despite their love for each other, Mi-ja and Young-sook’s differences are impossible to ignore. The Island of Sea Women is an epoch set over many decades, beginning during a period of Japanese colonialism in the 1930s and 1940s, followed by World War II, the Korean War and its aftermath, through the era of cell phones and wet suits for the women divers. Throughout this time, the residents of Jeju find themselves caught between warring empires. Mi-ja is the daughter of a Japanese collaborator, and she will forever be marked by this association. Young-sook was born into a long line of haenyeo and will inherit her mother’s position leading the divers in their village. Little do the two friends know that after surviving hundreds of dives and developing the closest of bonds, forces outside their control will push their friendship to the breaking point. This beautiful, thoughtful novel illuminates a world turned upside down, one where the women are in charge, engaging in dangerous physical work, and the men take care of the children. A classic Lisa See story—one of women’s friendships and the larger forces that shape them—The Island of Sea Women introduces readers to the fierce and unforgettable female divers of Jeju Island and the dramatic history that shaped their lives.


March 12th:

A Dangerous Collaboration (Veronica Speedwell #4) by Deanna Raybourn (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Berkley Books)
Victorian adventuress Veronica Speedwell is whisked off to a remote island off the tip of Cornwall when her natural historian colleague Stoker's brother calls in a favor. On the pretext of wanting a companion to accompany him to Lord Malcolm Romilly's house party, Tiberius persuades Veronica to pose as his fiancée--much to Stoker's chagrin. But upon arriving, it becomes clear that the party is not as innocent as it had seemed. Every invited guest has a connection to Romilly's wife, Rosamund, who disappeared on her wedding day three years ago, and a dramatic dinner proves she is very much on her husband's mind. As spectral figures, ghostly music, and mysterious threats begin to plague the partygoers, Veronica enlists Stoker's help to discover the host's true motivations. And as they investigate, it becomes clear that there are numerous mysteries surrounding the Romilly estate, and every person present has a motive to kill Rosamund...


American Princess: A Novel of First Daughter Alice Roosevelt by Stephanie Marie Thornton (Paperback, 448 pages, published by Berkley Books)
A sweeping novel from renowned author Stephanie Marie Thornton... Alice may be the president's daughter, but she's nobody's darling. As bold as her signature color Alice Blue, the gum-chewing, cigarette-smoking, poker-playing First Daughter discovers that the only way for a woman to stand out in Washington is to make waves--oceans of them. With the canny sophistication of the savviest politician on the Hill, Alice uses her celebrity to her advantage, testing the limits of her power and the seductive thrill of political entanglements. But Washington, DC is rife with heartaches and betrayals, and when Alice falls hard for a smooth-talking congressman it will take everything this rebel has to emerge triumphant and claim her place as an American icon. As Alice soldiers through the devastation of two world wars and brazens out a cutting feud with her famous Roosevelt cousins, it's no wonder everyone in the capital refers to her as the Other Washington Monument--and Alice intends to outlast them all.


March 19th:

The Last Year of the War by Susan Meissner (Hardcover, 400 pages, published by Berkley)
Elise Sontag is a typical Iowa fourteen-year-old in 1943--aware of the war but distanced from its reach. Then her father, a legal U.S. resident for nearly two decades, is suddenly arrested on suspicion of being a Nazi sympathizer. The family is sent to an internment camp in Texas, where, behind the armed guards and barbed wire, Elise feels stripped of everything beloved and familiar, including her own identity. The only thing that makes the camp bearable is meeting fellow internee Mariko Inoue, a Japanese-American teen from Los Angeles, whose friendship empowers Elise to believe the life she knew before the war will again be hers. Together in the desert wilderness, Elise and Mariko hold tight the dream of being young American women with a future beyond the fences.


March 21st:

The Old Drift by Namwali Serpell (Hardcover, 576 pages, published by Hogarth)
On the banks of the Zambezi River, a few miles from the majestic Victoria Falls, there was once a colonial settlement called The Old Drift. Here begins the epic story of a small African nation, told by a mysterious swarm-like chorus that calls itself man’s greatest nemesis. The tale? A playful panorama of history, fairytale, romance and science fiction. The moral? To err is human. In 1904, in a smoky room at the hotel across the river, an Old Drifter named Percy M. Clark, foggy with fever, makes a mistake that entangles the fates of an Italian hotelier and an African busboy. This sets off a cycle of unwitting retribution between three Zambian families (black, white, brown) as they collide and converge over the course of the century, into the present and beyond. As the generations pass, their lives – their triumphs, errors, losses and hopes – form a symphony about what it means to be human. From a woman covered with hair and another plagued with endless tears, to forbidden love affairs and fiery political ones, to homegrown technological marvels like Afronauts, microdrones and viral vaccines – this gripping, unforgettable novel sweeps over the years and the globe, subverting expectations along the way. Exploding with colour and energy, The Old Drift is a testament to our yearning to create and cross borders, and a meditation on the slow, grand passage of time.



• • • •

- Literary Fiction -

March 5th:

A Woman Is No Man by Etaf Rum (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Harper)
Introducing a brave, new Arab-American voice, an unflinching debut novel that takes us inside a world where few of us have been before: the lives of conservative Arab women living in America. In Brooklyn, eighteen-year-old Deya is starting to meet with suitors. Though she doesn’t want to get married, her grandparents give her no choice. History is repeating itself: Deya’s mother, Isra, also had no choice when she left Palestine as a teenager to marry Adam. Though Deya was raised to believe her parents died in a car accident, a secret note from a mysterious, yet familiar-looking woman makes Deya question everything she was told about her past. As the narrative alternates between the lives of Deya and Isra, she begins to understand the dark, complex secrets behind her fragile community. Set in an America that may feel removed yet is all too close at hand, A Woman Is No Man is both a gripping page-turner and an intimate family portrait. Fans of The Kite Runner and Everything I Never Told You will be drawn to this powerful novel.


Gingerbread by Helen Oyeyemi (Paperback, 435 pages, published by Random House Large Print Publishing)
Influenced by the mysterious place gingerbread holds in classic children's stories--equal parts wholesome and uncanny, from the tantalizing witch's house in "Hansel and Gretel" to the man-shaped confection who one day decides to run as fast as he can--beloved novelist Helen Oyeyemi invites readers into a delightful tale of a surprising family legacy, in which the inheritance is a recipe. Perdita Lee may appear to be your average British schoolgirl; Harriet Lee may seem just a working mother trying to penetrate the school social hierarchy; but there are signs that they might not be as normal as they think they are. For one thing, they share a gold-painted, seventh-floor walk-up apartment with some surprisingly verbal vegetation. And then there's the gingerbread they make. Londoners may find themselves able to take or leave it, but it's very popular in Druhástrana, the far-away (and, according to Wikipedia, non-existent) land of Harriet Lee's early youth. In fact, the world's truest lover of the Lee family gingerbread is Harriet's charismatic childhood friend, Gretel Kercheval--a figure who seems to have had a hand in everything (good or bad) that has happened to Harriet since they met. Decades later, when teenaged Perdita sets out to find her mother's long-lost friend, it prompts a new telling of Harriet's story. As the book follows the Lees through encounters with jealousy, ambition, family grudges, work, wealth, and real estate, gingerbread seems to be the one thing that reliably holds a constant value.


Joy: And 52 Other Very Short Stories by Erin McGraw (Hardcover, 304 pages, published by Counterpoint)
Widely celebrated, McGraw returns with her strongest collection yet, stories that will haunt you and amuse you and are impossible to forget. In these very short stories, narrators step out of themselves to explain their lives to us, sometimes defensively, sometimes regretfully, other times deceitfully. Voices include those of the impulsive first-time murderer, the depressed pet sitter, the assistant of Patsy Cline, the anxiety-riddled new mother, the aged rock and roller, the girlfriend of your husband—human beings often (incredibly) unaware of the turning points staring them in the face. Crossing time, states, class, and religions, McGraw’s stories are on the edge, causing you to wince even as you laugh.


Little Faith by Nickolas Butler (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Ecco)
In this moving new novel from celebrated author Nickolas Butler, a Wisconsin family grapples with the power and limitations of faith when one of their own falls under the influence of a radical church. Lyle Hovde is at the onset of his golden years, living a mostly content life in rural Wisconsin with his wife, Peg, daughter, Shiloh, and six-year old grandson, Isaac. After a troubled adolescence and subsequent estrangement from her parents, Shiloh has finally come home. But while Lyle is thrilled to have his whole family reunited, he’s also uneasy: in Shiloh’s absence, she has become deeply involved with an extremist church, and the devout pastor courting her is convinced Isaac has the spiritual ability to heal the sick. While reckoning with his own faith—or lack thereof—Lyle soon finds himself torn between his unease about the church and his desire to keep his daughter and grandson in his life. But when the church’s radical belief system threatens Isaac’s safety, Lyle is forced to make a decision from which the family may not recover. Set over the course of one year and beautifully evoking the change of seasons, Little Faith is a powerful and deeply affecting intergenerational novel about family and community, the ways in which belief is both formed and shaken, and the lengths we go to protect our own.


When All Is Said by Anne Griffin (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Thomas Dunne Books)
A tale of a single night. The story of a lifetime. If you had to pick five people to sum up your life, who would they be? If you were to raise a glass to each of them, what would you say? And what would you learn about yourself, when all is said and done? This is the story of Maurice Hannigan, who, over the course of a Saturday night in June, orders five different drinks at the Rainford House Hotel. With each he toasts a person vital to him: his doomed older brother, his troubled sister-in-law, his daughter of fifteen minutes, his son far off in America, and his late, lamented wife. And through these people, the ones who left him behind, he tells the story of his own life, with all its regrets and feuds, loves and triumphs. Beautifully written, powerfully felt, When All Is Said promises to be the next great Irish novel.


March 12th:

Tiny Americans by Devin Murphy (Paperback, 256 pages, published by Harper Perennial)
From the National Bestselling author of The Boat Runner comes a poignant, luminous novel that follows one family over decades and across the world—perfect for fans of the film Boyhood. Western New York, 1978: Jamie, Lewis, and Connor Thurber watch their parents’ destructive dance of loving, hating, and drinking. Terrance Thurber spends this year teaching his children about the natural world: they listen to the heartbeat of trees, track animal footprints, sleep under the star-filled sky. Despite these lessons, he doesn’t show them how to survive without him. And when these seasons of trying and failing to quit booze and be a better man are over, Terrance is gone. Alone with their artist mother, Catrin, the Thurber children are left to grapple with the anger they feel for the one parent who deserted them and a growing resentment for the one who didn’t. As Catrin withdraws into her own world, Jamie throws herself into painting while her brothers smash out their rage in brutal, no-holds-barred football games with neighborhood kids. Once they can leave—Jamie for college, Lewis for the navy, and Connor for work—they don’t look back. But Terrance does. Crossing the country, sobering up, and starting over has left him with razor-sharp regret. Terrance doesn’t know that Jamie, now an academic, inhabits an ever-shrinking circle of loneliness; that Lewis, a merchant marine, fears life on dry land; that Connor struggles to connect with the son he sees teetering on an all-too-familiar edge. He only knows that he has one last try to build a bridge, through the years, to his family. Composed of a series of touchstone moments, Tiny Americans is a thrilling and bittersweet rendering of a family that, much like the tides, continues to come together and drift apart.


March 13th:

Besotted by Melissa Duclos (Paperback, 246 pages, published by 7.13 Books)
Besotted is the ballad of Sasha and Liz, American expats in Shanghai. Both have moved abroad to escape—Sasha from her father’s disapproval, Liz from the predictability of her hometown. When they move in together, Sasha falls in love, but the sudden attention from a charming architect threatens the relationship. Meanwhile, Liz struggles to be both a good girlfriend to Sasha and a good friend to Sam, her Shanghainese language partner who needs more from her than grammar lessons. For fans of Prague by Arthur Phillips and The Expatriates by Janice Y.K. Lee, Besotted is an expat novel that explores what it means to love someone while running away from yourself.


March 19th:

In the Blink of an Eye by Jesse Blackadder (Hardcover, 384 pages, published by St. Martin's Press)
A deeply emotional drama that explores a family’s path to forgiveness and redemption in the aftermath of a tragedy. The Brennans — parents, Finn and Bridget, and their sons, Jarrah and Toby — have made a sea change, from chilly Hobart, Tasmania, to subtropical Murwillumbah, New South Wales. Feeling like foreigners in this land of sun and surf, they're still adjusting to work, school, and life in a sprawling purple clapboard house, when one morning, tragedy strikes. In the devastating aftermath, the questions fly. What really happened? And who's to blame? Determined to protect his family, Finn finds himself under the police and media spotlight. Guilty and enraged, Bridget spends nights hunting answers in the last place imaginable. Jarrah — his innocence lost — faces a sudden and frightening adulthood where nothing is certain. In the Blink of an Eye is a haunting, redemptive story about forgiveness and hope.


Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams (Hardcover, 320 pages, published by Orion Publishing)
Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle class peers. After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places… including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth. As Queenie careens from one questionable decision to another, she finds herself wondering, “What are you doing? Why are you doing it? Who do you want to be?”—all of the questions today’s woman must face in a world trying to answer them for her. With “fresh and honest” (Jojo Moyes) prose, Queenie is a remarkably relatable exploration of what it means to be a modern woman searching for meaning in today’s world.


The Word for Woman Is Wilderness by Abi Andrews (Kindle Edition, 338 pages, published by Two Dollar Radio)
This is a new kind of nature writing — one that crosses fiction with science writing and puts gender politics at the center of the landscape. Erin, a 19-year-old girl from middle England, is travelling to Alaska on a journey that takes her through Iceland, Greenland, and across Canada. She is making a documentary about how men are allowed to express this kind of individualism and personal freedom more than women are, based on masculinist ideas of survivalism and the shunning of society: the “Mountain Man.” She plans to culminate her journey with an experiment: living in a cabin in the Alaskan wilderness, a la Thoreau, to explore it from a feminist perspective. The book is a fictional time-capsule curated by Erin from this time comprising of personal narrative, fact, anecdote, images and maps, on subjects as diverse as The Golden Records, Voyager 1, the moon landings, the appropriation of native land and culture, Rachel Carson, The Order of The Dolphin, The Doomsday Clock, Ted Kaczynski, Valentina Tereshkova, Jack London, Thoreau, Darwin, Nuclear war, The Letters of Last Resort and the pill, amongst many other topics.


March 26th:

The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick (Paperback, 336 pages, published by Park Row)
Librarian Martha Storm has always found it easier to connect with books than people--though not for lack of trying. She keeps careful lists of how to help others in her superhero-themed notebook. And yet, sometimes it feels like she's invisible. All of that changes when a book of fairy tales arrives on her doorstep. Inside, Martha finds a dedication written to her by her best friend--her grandmother Zelda--who died under mysterious circumstances years earlier. When Martha discovers a clue within the book that her grandmother may still be alive, she becomes determined to discover the truth. As she delves deeper into Zelda's past, she unwittingly reveals a family secret that will change her life forever. Filled with Phaedra Patrick's signature charm and vivid characters, The Library of Lost and Found is a heartwarming and poignant tale of how one woman must take control of her destiny to write her own happy ending.


March 27th:

Not Everyone Is Special by Josh Denslow (Paperback, 160 pages, published by 7.13 Books)
A teen who can teleport just wants to make his mom happy. A midget working as an elf in a year-round Christmas-themed amusement park battles his archrival: a condescending Santa. You’ve heard of Fight Club, but have you been to the Underground Punch Market? Like the work of George Saunders crossed with Richard Linklater, NOT EVERYONE IS SPECIAL is a collection of slacker fabulist stories that are at once speculative, hilarious, and poignant.



• • • •

- Young Adult -

March 5th:

Chrysalis (Project Nemesis #3) by Brendan Reichs (Hardcover, 416 pages, published by G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers)
The 64 members of Fire Lake's sophomore class have managed to survive the first two phases of the Program--and each other. Now, they alone have emerged into the dawn of a new era on Earth, into a Fire Lake valley that's full of otherworldly dangers and challenges. Although staying alive in this broken world should force Min, Noah, Tack, and the others to form new alliances, old feuds die hard, and the brutality of the earlier Program phases cannot be forgotten. But being a team isn't easy for the sophomores, and when they discover that they may not be alone on the planet after all, they'll have to decide if they're going to work together... or die together.

Deathcaster (Shattered Realms #4) by Cinda Williams Chima (Paperback, 656 pages, published by HarperTeen)
Warrior Alyssa ana’Raisa would do anything to protect her home, the Fells, and her legacy, the Gray Wolf line. But as a prisoner of Empress Celestine, Lyss is forced to turn her fearsome talents as an army commander against her beloved homeland. Refusal would swiftly lead to her death, and her death would end the Gray Wolf line. In Lyss’s absence, Fellsmarch Castle swarms with intrigue, deception, and a primordial threat. Destin Karn, a southern spymaster with a hidden agenda of his own, might be the queendom’s only hope of defeating the forces aligned against the Seven Realms... as well as the enemies within the castle.

Moon Tracks (Moon Beam, #2) by Travis S. Taylor and Jody Lynn Nye (Hardcover, 320 pages, published by Baen Books)
A teenage girl and her fellow Bright Sparks must do what it takes to stay alive and achieve success in this sequel to Moon Beam. Barbara Winton and the rest of the Bright Sparks, Dr. Keegan Bright’s team of young scientists, find themselves facing a challenge that will test all of their scientific skills and personal courage. They are competing in the first ever race to completely circle the Moon. The Sparks, and twenty-five other teams, have to count on one another as they face thousands of kilometers of unknown dangers, where even a simple accident can have fatal consequences. They form close friendships with racers from all over Earth, but also have to deal with former Spark, Pam, a mysterious and threatening figure whose departure from the Sparks program is shrouded in mystery. While the Sparks compete in the race, Dr. Bright himself is part of a groundbreaking project to seek out rare minerals underneath a crater. On the far side of the Moon, in the airless, frozen depths beneath the lunar surface, disaster strikes. On the thinly settled Moon only the Bright Sparks may be close enough help him. The young scientist find themselves not only racing for victory, but to save their beloved mentor.

Opposite of Always by Justin A. Reynolds (Hardcover, 464 pages, published by Katherine Tegen Books)
Jack Ellison King. King of Almost. He almost made valedictorian. He almost made varsity. He almost got the girl... When Jack and Kate meet at a party, bonding until sunrise over their mutual love of Froot Loops and their favorite flicks, Jack knows he’s falling—hard. Soon she’s meeting his best friends, Jillian and Franny, and Kate wins them over as easily as she did Jack. Jack’s curse of almost is finally over. But this love story is... complicated. It is an almost happily ever after. Because Kate dies. And their story should end there. Yet Kate’s death sends Jack back to the beginning, the moment they first meet, and Kate’s there again. Beautiful, radiant Kate. Healthy, happy, and charming as ever. Jack isn’t sure if he’s losing his mind. Still, if he has a chance to prevent Kate’s death, he’ll take it. Even if that means believing in time travel. However, Jack will learn that his actions are not without consequences. And when one choice turns deadly for someone else close to him, he has to figure out what he’s willing to do—and let go—to save the people he loves.


The Everlasting Rose (The Belles #2) by Dhonielle Clayton (Hardcover, 352 pages, published by Freeform)
In this sequel to the instant New York Times bestseller, Camille, her sister Edel, and her guard and new love Remy must race against time to find Princess Charlotte. Sophia's Imperial forces will stop at nothing to keep the rebels from returning Charlotte to the castle and her rightful place as queen. With the help of an underground resistance movement called The Iron Ladies-a society that rejects beauty treatments entirely-and the backing of alternative newspaper The Spider's Web, Camille uses her powers, her connections and her cunning to outwit her greatest nemesis, Sophia, and restore peace to Orleans.

The Fairest Kind of Love (Windy City Magic #3) by Crystal Cestari (Hardcover, 320 pages, published by Disney-Hyperion)
Amber Sand has spent half her life solidifying other people's happily-ever-afters. As a matchmaker, she has the ability to look into anyone's eyes and see their perfect match. But lately, her powers have been on the fritz, and not only is she totally unsure whether her matches are true, she can't see anyone in the eyes of her boyfriend Charlie Blitzman. With Amber and her friends graduating high school and about to take off for various colleges, Amber is hoping to have one last carefree summer-but she's also dying to find a way to fix her powers, and learn, for better or worse, if she and Charlie are truly meant to be. So when an online matchmaker named Madame Lamour comes to Chicago, Amber sets out to talk to her and find out who her match is once and for all. Of course, when it comes to the magical community, nothing's ever that easy, and Amber soon finds herself caught up in a breathless showdown that involves a fairy family feud and a magical-creature auction--and requires teaming up with a certain siren nemesis. Can Amber and her friends save the day one more time before setting off for their new lives? And will Amber ever learn whether Charlie is her one true love?

The Last 8 (The Last 8 #1) by Laura Pohl (Hardcover, 384 pages, published by Sourcebooks Fire)
Clover Martinez has always been a survivor, which is the only reason she isn't among the dead when aliens invade and destroy Earth as she knows it. When Clover hears an inexplicable radio message, she's shocked to learn there are other survivors—and that they're all at the former Area 51. When she arrives, she's greeted by a band of misfits who call themselves The Last Teenagers on Earth. Only they aren't the ragtag group of heroes Clover was expecting. The group seems more interested in hiding than fighting back, and Clover starts to wonder if she was better off alone. But then she finds a hidden spaceship, and she doesn't know what to believe… or who to trust.

The Queen’s Resistance (Queen’s Rising #2) by Rebecca Ross (Hardcover, 432 pages, published by HarperTeen)
Finally, Brienna is a mistress of knowledge and is settling into her role as the daughter of Davin MacQuinn, a disgraced lord who returned to Maevana to reclaim his house. Though she’d just survived a revolution, one that will finally return a queen to the throne, she faces another difficult challenge. She must prove herself trustworthy to the MacQuinns. But as Queen Isolde Kavanagh’s closest confidant, she’ll have to balance serving her father’s house as well as her country. And then there’s Cartier, a wholly separate but desirable factor in her new life. Aodhan Morgane, formerly known as Cartier Évariste, is adjusting to the stark contrast between his pre-rebellion life in Valenia as a master of knowledge and his current one as the lord of a fallen house. During his castle’s restoration, he discovers a ten-year-old boy named Tomas, whose past and parentage are a complete mystery. So when Cartier’s former pupil Brienna is as taken with Tomas as he is, he lets his mind wander—what if he doesn’t have to raise him or his house alone? As the Lannon trial rapidly approaches, Brienna and Cartier must put their feelings aside to concentrate on forging alliances, executing justice, and ensuring that no one interferes with the queen’s coronation. But resistance is rumbling among the old regime’s supporters, who are desperate to find a weakness in the rebels’ forces. And nothing makes a person more vulnerable than deep-seated love.

The Pioneer (The Pioneer #1) by Bridget Tyler (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by HarperTeen)
When Jo steps onto planet Tau Ceti E for the first time, she’s ready to put the past behind her and begin again. After all, as a pioneer, she has the job of helping build a new home away from Earth. But underneath the idyllic surface of their new home, there’s something very wrong. And when Jo accidentally uncovers a devastating secret that could destroy everything they’ve worked for, suddenly the future doesn’t seem so bright. With the fate of the pioneers in her hands, Jo must decide how far she’s willing to go to expose the truth—before the truth destroys them all.

The Shadow Glass (The Bone Witch #3) by Rin Chupeco (Hardcover, 432 pages, published by Sourcebooks Fire)
Tea is a bone witch with the dark magic needed to raise the dead. She has used this magic to breathe life into those she has loved and lost… and those who would join her army against the deceitful royals. But Tea's quest to conjure a shadowglass—to achieve immortality for the one person she loves most in the world—threatens to consume her heart. Tea's black heartsglass only grows darker with each new betrayal. And when she is left with new blood on her hands, Tea must answer to a power greater than the elder asha or even her conscience...

March 12th:

Beware the Night by Jessika Fleck (Hardcover, 320 pages, published by Swoon Reads)
When her world divides, pitting light against dark, Veda must join a dangerous revolution to save her grandfather and fight against injustice... even if it costs her the boy she loves. On the island of Bellona, life is peaceful--as long as the citizens dutifully worship the Sun, which protects them from all harm. Seventeen-year-old Veda knows that keeping the Sun happy will protect her and her grandfather from the Night, the dangerous people who snatch innocent citizens from their beds under the cover of darkness, never to be seen again. As long as Veda follows the rules, she will be safe. But when Veda's grandfather is offered up as the next sacrificial offering to keep the Sun's favor, she starts to see that the safety she's been promised comes at a dangerous price. Maybe there is more to fear above than there is below. With a mysterious young man, Dorian, at her side, Veda has to figure out if the scary bedtime stories she grew up hearing are real--or dangerous lies.

The Tesla Legacy by K.K. Perez (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by Tor Teen)
THE TESLA LEGACY follows a precocious young scientist named Lucy Phelps whose fateful encounter in the Tesla Suite of the New Yorker Hotel unlocks her dormant electrical powers. As Lucy struggles to understand her new abilities through scientific experimentation, she is thrust into a centuries old battle between rival alchemical societies. One side wants her help and the other wants her dead, but both believe she is the next step in human evolution. Unfortunately, carriers of the genetic mutation—including Nikola Tesla—have a greatly reduced life expectancy. Even if Lucy can outrun her enemies, she can’t outrun herself.


The Waking Forest by Alyssa Wees (Hardcover, 304 pages, published by Delacorte Press)
The waking forest has secrets. To Rhea, it appears like a mirage, dark and dense, at the very edge of her backyard. But when she reaches out to touch it, the forest vanishes. She's desperate to know more--until she finds a peculiar boy who offers to reveal its secrets. If she plays a game. To the Witch, the forest is her home, where she sits on her throne of carved bone, waiting for dreaming children to beg her to grant their wishes. One night, a mysterious visitor arrives and asks her what she wishes for, but the Witch sends him away. And then the uninvited guest returns. The strangers are just the beginning. Something is stirring in the forest, and when Rhea's and the Witch's paths collide, a truth more treacherous and deadly than either could ever imagine surfaces. But how much are they willing to risk to survive?

When the Sky Fell on Splendor by Emily Henry (Hardcover, 384 pages, published by Razorbill)
Almost everyone in the small town of Splendor, Ohio, was affected when the local steel mill exploded. If you weren’t a casualty of the accident yourself, chances are a loved one was. That’s the case for seventeen-year-old Franny, who, five years after the explosion, still has to stand by and do nothing as her brother lies in a coma. In the wake of the tragedy, Franny found solace in a group of friends whose experiences mirrored her own. The group calls themselves The Ordinary, and they spend their free time investigating local ghost stories and legends, filming their exploits for their small following of YouTube fans. It’s silly, it’s fun, and it keeps them from dwelling on the sadness that surrounds them. Until one evening, when the strange and dangerous thing they film isn’t fiction–it’s a bright light, something massive hurdling toward them from the sky. And when it crashes and the teens go to investigate… everything changes.


March 19th:

Between the Water and the Woods by Simone Snaith (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by Holiday House)
Emeline’s quiet village has three important rules: Don’t look at the shadows. Don’t cross the river. And don’t enter the forest. An illustrated fantasy filled with beauty and power, BETWEEN THE WATER AND THE WOODS sweeps you into a world where forests are hungry; knights fight with whips; the king is dying; and a peasant girl’s magic will decide the future of the realm… When Emeline’s little brother breaks all three of their village’s rules, she is forced to use her family’s forbidden magic to rescue him from the dark things he awakens, the Ithin. Now that the Ithin are afoot in the land, she must, by law, travel to the royal court and warn the king. But the only way she and her family can make the journey to the capital is with the protection of a sour magister and a handsome, whip-wielding Lash Knight. Will Emeline survive in a city where conspiracies swirl like smoke and her magic is all but outlawed?

Girls with Sharp Sticks by Suzanne Young (Paperback, 400 pages, published by Simon Pulse)
Westworld meets The Handmaid’s Tale in this start to a thrilling, subversive near future series from New York Times bestselling author Suzanne Young about a girls-only private high school that is far more than it appears to be. The Girls of Innovations Academy are beautiful and well-behaved—it says so on their report cards. Under the watchful gaze of their Guardians, the all-girl boarding school offers an array of studies and activities, from “Growing a Beautiful and Prosperous Garden” to “Art Appreciation” and “Interior Design.” The girls learn to be the best society has to offer. Absent is the difficult math coursework, or the unnecessary sciences or current events. They are obedient young ladies, free from arrogance or defiance. Until Mena starts to realize that their carefully controlled existence may not be quite as it appears. As Mena and her friends begin to uncover the dark secrets of what’s actually happening there—and who they really are—the girls of Innovations will find out what they are truly capable of. Because some of the prettiest flowers have the sharpest thorns.


Internment by Samira Ahmed (Hardcover, 400 pages, published by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)
Rebellions are built on hope. Set in a horrifying near-future United States, seventeen-year-old Layla Amin and her parents are forced into an internment camp for Muslim American citizens. With the help of newly made friends also trapped within the internment camp, her boyfriend on the outside, and an unexpected alliance, Layla begins a journey to fight for freedom, leading a revolution against the internment camp's Director and his guards. Heart-racing and emotional, Internment challenges readers to fight complicit silence that exists in our society today.

Never-Contented Things: A Novel of Faerie by Sarah Porter (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by Tor Teen)
Seductive. Cruel. Bored. Prince and his fairy courtiers are staggeringly beautiful, unrelentingly cruel, and exhausted by the tedium of the centuries―until they meet foster-siblings Josh and Ksenia. Drawn in by their vivid emotions, undying love for each other, and passion for life, Prince will stop at nothing to possess them. First seduced and then entrapped by the fairies, Josh and Ksenia learn that the fairies' otherworldly gifts come at a terrible price―and they must risk everything in order to reclaim their freedom.


Winter War Awakening (Blood Rose Rebellion #3) by Rosalyn Eves (Hardcover, 368 pages, published by Knopf Books For Young Readers)
The Binding is broken. Mátyás is alive. And Anna Arden is on the run. It seems, yet again, that breaking the Binding has shattered the world. And the only hope of mending it is Anna and Mátyás, working together. But it’s never that simple, is it? The praetheria, the creatures once held captive by the spell, are now waging war against the Austro-Hungarian empire. And they are holding Noémi hostage–using her life to manipulate Anna and Mátyás, like marionettes on a string. Gábor has elected to stay behind, to fight in the Hungarian army’s resistance, while Anna and Mátyás search for their beloved Noémi–a mission doomed from the start, cloaked in praetherian magic. Magic that relies on illusion and misdirection. Eventually, there’s only one way to save her: to split up. And to walk right into the lion’s den. When everyone thinks they’re fighting each other for the same thing–freedom–can anyone truly win?


March 26th:

Ruse (Want #2) by Cindy Pon (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Simon Pulse)
Jason Zhou, his friends, and Daiyu are still recovering from the aftermath of bombing Jin Corp headquarters. But Jin, the ruthless billionaire and Daiyu’s father, is out for blood. When Lingyi goes to Shanghai to help Jany Tsai, a childhood acquaintance in trouble, she doesn’t expect Jin to be involved. And when Jin has Jany murdered and steals the tech she had refused to sell him, Lingyi is the only one who has access to the encrypted info, putting her own life in jeopardy. Zhou doesn’t hesitate to fly to China to help Iris find Lingyi, even though he’s been estranged from his friends for months. But when Iris tells him he can’t tell Daiyu or trust her, he balks. The reunited group play a treacherous cat and mouse game in the labyrinthine streets of Shanghai, determined on taking back what Jin had stolen. When Daiyu appears in Shanghai, Zhou is uncertain if it’s to confront him or in support of her father. Jin has proudly announced Daiyu will be by his side for the opening ceremony of Jin Tower, his first “vertical city.” And as hard as Zhou and his friends fight, Jin always gains the upper hand. Is this a game they can survive, much less win?

Sky Without Stars (System Divine #1) by Jessica Brody and Joanne Rendell (Hardcover, 592 pages, published by Simon Pulse)
A thief. An officer. A guardian. Three strangers, one shared destiny... When the Last Days came, the planet of Laterre promised hope. A new life for a wealthy French family and their descendants. But five hundred years later, it’s now a place where an extravagant elite class reigns supreme; where the clouds hide the stars and the poor starve in the streets; where a rebel group, long thought dead, is resurfacing. Whispers of revolution have begun—a revolution that hinges on three unlikely heroes… Chatine is a street-savvy thief who will do anything to escape the brutal Regime, including spy on Marcellus, the grandson of the most powerful man on the planet. Marcellus is an officer—and the son of a renowned traitor. In training to take command of the military, Marcellus begins to doubt the government he’s vowed to serve when his father dies and leaves behind a cryptic message that only one person can read: a girl named Alouette. Alouette is living in an underground refuge, where she guards and protects the last surviving library on the planet. But a shocking murder will bring Alouette to the surface for the first time in twelve years… and plunge Laterre into chaos. All three have a role to play in a dangerous game of revolution—and together they will shape the future of a planet.

The Beast Player by Nahoko Uehashi (Hardcover, 352 pages, published by Henry Holt and Co.)
In epic YA fantasy about a girl with a special power to communicate with magical beasts and the warring kingdom only she can save. Elin's family has an important responsibility: caring for the fearsome water serpents that form the core of their kingdom's army. So when some of the beasts mysteriously die, Elin's mother is sentenced to death as punishment. With her last breath she manages to send her daughter to safety. Alone, far from home, Elin soon discovers that she can talk to both the terrifying water serpents and the majestic flying beasts that guard her queen. This skill gives her great powers, but it also involves her in deadly plots that could cost her life. Can she save herself and prevent her beloved beasts from being used as tools of war? Or is there no way of escaping the terrible battles to come?

The Last Voyage of Poe Blythe by Ally Condie (Hardcover, 336 pages, published by Dutton Books for Young Readers)
Who do you become when you have nothing left to lose? There is something Poe Blythe, the seventeen-year-old captain of the Outpost’s last mining ship, wants far more than the gold they tear from the Serpentine River. Revenge. Poe has vowed to annihilate the river raiders who robbed her of everything two years ago. But as she navigates the treacherous waters of the Serpentine and realizes there might be a traitor among her crew, she must also reckon with who she has become, who she wants to be, and the ways love can change and shape you. Even—and especially—when you think all is lost. Ally Condie, the international bestselling author of the Matched trilogy, returns with an intricately crafted and emotionally gripping story of one young woman’s journey to move beyond the grief and anger that control her and find the inner strength to chart her own course.


The Rebel Mages: An Anthology by Laurie Forest (Paperback, 608 pages, published by Inkyard Press)
Journey to the magical world of Erthia in these two exciting prequels to The Black Witch by critically acclaimed author Laurie Forest: Wandfasted - Twenty years before Elloren Gardner enrolled at the illustrious Verpax University, Erthia was rent asunder during the devastating Realm War. When Tessla Harrow is driven from her home by the fighting, she discovers a depth of power she never knew she had… and an irresistible draw toward Vale Gardner, the son of the most powerful mage her people have ever known—the Black Witch. Light Mage - Before Elloren came to possess the White Wand of myth, the Wand was drawn to another bearer: Sagellyn Gaffney. Sage’s affinity for light magery, a rare skill among Gardnerians, makes her the perfect protector for the one tool that can combat the shadows spreading across Erthia. But in order to keep the Wand safe from the dark forces hunting for it, Sage must abandon everything she once knew and forge a new path for herself… a dangerous course that could lead to either triumph or utter ruin.


(sources: io9.Gizmodo, Goodreads.com 1 2 3 4 5 6,
Tor.com 1 2 3 4 5 6 7, Barnes&Noble 1 2 3, BookBub.com 1 2 3)


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